Kalmar Castle

Kalmar, Sweden

The first defensive construction, a round tower, was built on Kalmarsund in the 12th century concurrently with the harbour. At the end of the 13th century King Magnus Ladulås had a new fortress built with a curtain wall, round corner towers and two square gatehouses surrounding the original tower. Located near the site of Kalmar's medieval harbor, it has played a crucial part in Swedish history since its initial construction as a fortified tower in the 12th century.

One of the most significant political events in Scandinavia took place at Kalmar Castle in 1397, when the Kalmar Union was formed - a union of Denmark, Norway and Sweden, organized by Queen Margaret I of Denmark. During the Swedish rebellion against Denmark in1520, the fortress was commanded by Anna Eriksdotter.

The fortress was improved during the 16th century under the direction of King Gustav I and his sons King Eric XIV and King John III, who turned the medieval fortress into a castle fit for a renaissance king. Kalmar Castle suffered heavy damage during the Kalmar War of 1611-13 and was badly damaged by a fire in 1642. Repairs were begun but from the end of the seventeenth century the castle was allowed to fall into disrepair.

In 1856, architect Fredrik Wilhelm Scholander (1816 - 1881) initiated restoration work at Kalmar Castle. His pupil Helgo Zettervall continued restoring Kalmar Castle in the 1880s. Architect Carl Möller drew up the plans and other documents. The work began in 1885 and by 1891 the castle had gained the silhouette it bears today. In 1919 professor Martin Olsson was charged with the continuing restoration of earthworks, the moat, the bridge and the drawbridge. Work continued until 1941, when the castle was once more surrounded by water. Today, it is one of Sweden's best preserved renaissance castles and is open to the public.

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Address

Kungsgatan 1, Kalmar, Sweden
See all sites in Kalmar

Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jolene Arendse (6 months ago)
Good experience. Good value. A bit nippy. Bring a jacket if winter.
Michael Söderlund (7 months ago)
A Christmas market I would like to recommend!
Miljko Kucevic (10 months ago)
Lovely castle. With an important history for Sweden. The view and surroundings are beautiful to see. You can enter the castle and see many interesting rooms. Each room is unique and suprising.
Wan T. Tu (10 months ago)
Beautiful castle to see from outside. Has a decent cafe/restaurant. Not necessary to purchase ticket to visit inside.
Jarno Paldanius (12 months ago)
Lots of interesting things to see. Tours are great! It's really great to notice that castle is well maintained. Family ticket packet is also quite reasonably priced. Must see if you visit Kalmar!
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