Härnösand Cathedral

Härnösand, Sweden

Härnösand city's first church was built 1593. In 1721 the church was burned down by Russian troops, and a new church was erected, and that church was eventually destroyed. The present church was completed in 1846 and built according to plans by John Hawerman. The present church is located in the same location as the original and is Sweden's smallest cathedral.

The altar painting is by David von Coln. The organ was built in 1975 by the Danish firm of Bruno Christenssen and has 57 stops. The organ facade is from the 1700s Cahman organ that was saved from the original church. The baptismal font is a Spanish rococo work in silver and manufactured 1777.

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Details

Founded: 1846
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Union with Norway and Modernization (Sweden)

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en.wikipedia.org

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