Stegeborg Castle Ruins

Söderköping, Sweden

The remains of the Stegeborg castle are situated beautifully on a little island in the sea channel leading toward Söderköping. In the Middle Ages the castle was one of the most important strongholds in Sweden and also a royal palace. The oldest parts of the castle is a brick tower in the southeast corner, built in the early 13th century.

In the 18th century the castle was in bad shape and some wooden buildings were even were auctioned off. In 1938 the Swedish National Heritage Board received a small sum to clear the location of trees and repair the worst damage and raise protective roofing over certain parts. The new main building (a private residence) was completed in 1806. The herb-garden was laid out in 1988 by the present owner.

Today Stegeborg is open for tourists and the castle ruins are now also a port tavern and a marina.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Ruins in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Andreas Andersson (2 years ago)
Costs money to visit. Machine to buy tickets turned off. Ferry and the sorrounding nature was nice though!
Britta Lerch (2 years ago)
Very interesting and historic place. Good tour from local guide in cooperation with Gotercanal crew.
Karl Arneng (2 years ago)
Nice tour around the castle, you can borrow a "mp3 stick" to get a audioguide with Herman Lindqvist.
Oskar Söderberg (2 years ago)
Great for a short stop. Maybe if you have an afternoon over on the way home from something else.
jamie roling (2 years ago)
Very pretty both the castle itself and the nature around it. The restaurant next to it has excellent food with a stunning view
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