Norrtälje Church

Norrtälje, Sweden

In 1719, during the Great Northern War, large parts of the central town were burnt down by a Russian army. The new stone church wasn't finished until 1726. The tower was erected in 1752.

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Details

Founded: 1726
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: The Age of Liberty (Sweden)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

alber celiker (8 months ago)
Stark rekommenderar ganska kunnig präst
Marcus Jansson (8 months ago)
Mysigt och ganska stor kyrka. Va där på dop.
Stefan Karin Forsberg (9 months ago)
Kajsa Stina Åkerström jättebra
Kevin Sorensen (2 years ago)
A beautiful church that you should see from the inside as well
Alexander Lundqvist (3 years ago)
Pretty old
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