Vaxholm Castle was originally constructed by Gustav Vasa in 1544 to defend Stockholm against shipborne attacks from the east, but most of the current structure dates from 1833-1863. The stretch of water below the building was formerly the main sea route to Stockholm. Thus, the fortress was strategically situated to defend the city from naval attacks. The castle was attacked by the Danes in 1612 and the Russian navy in 1719. Since the mid 19th century, its military importance has ceased. Today, it is home to the Swedish National Museum of Coastal Defence.

In 1970, it was used as a movie location for the pirate stronghold in Pippi Longstocking in Taka Tuka land. A scenic view of the castle may be seen from the car ferry which plies the short distance between Vaxholm and Rindö.

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Address

Vaxholm, Stockholm, Sweden
See all sites in Stockholm

Details

Founded: 1544, 1833-1863
Category: Castles and fortifications in Sweden
Historical period: Early Vasa Era (Sweden)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Minna Laine (2 years ago)
Great venue. Go for the games before dinner. So much fun. And yes, the food is sooooo good.
Pedro Cruz (2 years ago)
Really nice place to visit. Nice museum. Next time I would like to try the bed and breakfast.
Ricky D (2 years ago)
Well worth a visit. Beautiful day out.
Lakshmi Priya Shanmugam (2 years ago)
Beautiful castle and nice location. We enjoyed going around the castle. There are benches with table outside the castle in case you want to rest or have a meal.
Nathaniel Lee (2 years ago)
Cool place to see but not worth more than a half hour visit. The town around the fortresses is very pretty but seemed a little expensive.
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