Roslags-Bro Church

Norrtälje, Sweden

Roslags-Bro church was built of granite in the 13th century. It was built by an important sea-route, since disappeared as a consequence of the post-glacial rebound. Immured in the church is a runestone from the 11th century.

The tower was added in the 1400s and restored in 1700s. The church is famous due its fine sculptures. The wooden sculpture of Eric IX of Sweden, made in France in 1200s, has been model to Stockholm city coat of arms. The crucifix made in Gotland and font date also from the 13th century. The altar and other saint sculptures date from the 15th century.

References:
  • Marianne Mehling et al. Knaurs Kulturführer in Farbe. Schweden. München 1987.

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Address

1146, Norrtälje, Sweden
See all sites in Norrtälje

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Arvydas Pocys (2 years ago)
Church in typical Swedish style.
Lotta Unosson (3 years ago)
Nice country church with ancient origins
Mats Gustaf Jansson (3 years ago)
Nice old church.
Hanna Spaanheden (3 years ago)
Love this place where my grandparents rest.
Robin Alfredsson (5 years ago)
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