The Church of St. Michael

Pälkäne, Finland

The old church of Pälkäne dates back to the beginning of 16th century. During reformation it was modified to meet the requirements of new religious policies. For example wooden statues of Catholic saints were removed.

Church was robbed by the Russian troops during the Greater Wrath in 1714-1721. Church started to dilapidate during the 1740s and it was finally abandoned when new church was completed in 1839. The roof collapsed in winter storm 3.12.1890.

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Details

Founded: 1495-1505
Category: Ruins in Finland
Historical period: Middle Ages (Finland)

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4.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Essi Syrjynen (4 years ago)
Vili mäkelä (4 years ago)
Tunnelmallinen kirkko, upea ja kaunis sisältä
Mikki_ Hiiri (4 years ago)
Hienon näköinen ja hyvällä paikalla. Historiakin on jännää luettavaa
Aku Hytönen (4 years ago)
Hieno ja avara vanha kirkko.
Orava (5 years ago)
Wiki: Pälkäneenkirkko on uusgoottilaistatyylinen suuntaa edustava tiilinen kirkkorakennus Pälkäneellä. Se on arkkitehti Carl Ludvig Engelin piirtämä ja rakennettu vuosina 1836–1839. Professori P. E. Limnellin vuonna 1841maalaama alttaritaulu esittää JeesustaGetsemanessa. Kirkon vieressä on hautausmaa, jonne on haudattu 165 pälkäneläistä sankarivainajaa. Hautausmaalla on Bertel Strömmerin suunnittelema muistokivi. Vuonna 1961 kirkkopihaan pystytettiin Karjalaan jääneiden vainajien muistokivi Elämän kirja.
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