Schackenborg Castle

Tønder, Denmark

Schackenborg Castle is the private residence of Prince Joachim of Denmark, the 2nd son of the present Danish monarch. One of the Northern Europe’s most beautiful village street from the beginning of the 1700s leads to Møgeltønderhus, better known as Schackenborg Palace. Møgeltønderhus was the castle for the bishops of Ribe. It served as protection against the influx of Frisian culture from the south and guarded the waterway from Vidå to Tønder. The building was transferred to the King after the Reformation, and in 1661 the King conveyed the castle to general Hans Schack as a gesture of gratitude for his service in the war against the Swedes.

For 11 generations, the Palace belonged to the Schack family until it came into the Royal Family’s ownership in 1978. In 1993, Schackenborg Palace and its associated farm and lands were taken over by Prince Joachim. The Palace is not open to the public. In summer, there are guided tours to the palace garden.

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Details

Founded: 1661
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Denmark
Historical period: Absolutism (Denmark)

Rating

3.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Michael Trumpf (19 months ago)
Var til julemarked. Havde nok sat næsen op efter mere og var derfor måske nok en smule skuffet. Var lidt sat op udenfor og et telt med boder og en madbod, men ikke ret meget.
Tina Holm (2 years ago)
Var til jule marked, det var ok. Men det var mere for at folk kunne sælge noget, ikke for hyggen. Alarm fra Falck, luft rensere o.s.v. det er der ikke meget jul ved.
Kirsten Appel Jessen (2 years ago)
Uroligt skuffende. Ingen guidet rundtur, som vi havde betalt for på nettet. Ingen hestevogns tur og ej heller en julemand. Dette var lørdag den 8. December. Derfor kun 1 stjerne.
Hans Kristian Olsen (2 years ago)
Det velholdt ud på afstand, men kommer man tættere på kan man se, at det trænger til vedligeholdelse
Claudia Mikaelsen (2 years ago)
Cannot be visited unless booked in advance. The town around is though very cosy and authentic.
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