Schackenborg Castle

Tønder, Denmark

Schackenborg Castle is the private residence of Prince Joachim of Denmark, the 2nd son of the present Danish monarch. One of the Northern Europe’s most beautiful village street from the beginning of the 1700s leads to Møgeltønderhus, better known as Schackenborg Palace. Møgeltønderhus was the castle for the bishops of Ribe. It served as protection against the influx of Frisian culture from the south and guarded the waterway from Vidå to Tønder. The building was transferred to the King after the Reformation, and in 1661 the King conveyed the castle to general Hans Schack as a gesture of gratitude for his service in the war against the Swedes.

For 11 generations, the Palace belonged to the Schack family until it came into the Royal Family’s ownership in 1978. In 1993, Schackenborg Palace and its associated farm and lands were taken over by Prince Joachim. The Palace is not open to the public. In summer, there are guided tours to the palace garden.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 1661
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Denmark
Historical period: Absolutism (Denmark)

Rating

3.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Bjarne Noll (18 months ago)
Det er da meget flot, men så det kun udefra. Det ville være bedre at se det på en rundtur. Så oplevelsen var Ikke så god.
Sofus Würtz (2 years ago)
Guided tour was very nice. Not so child friendly, since it is a lot of listening. Could be difficult for some children.
Rhiannon Hansen (2 years ago)
Wasn't able to visit the castle, however the surrounding town is well maintained and has some extremely beautiful old buildings, and a delightful café.
Bastian Süß (2 years ago)
Unfortunately only accessible with guided tours
Michael Trumpf (3 years ago)
Var til julemarked. Havde nok sat næsen op efter mere og var derfor måske nok en smule skuffet. Var lidt sat op udenfor og et telt med boder og en madbod, men ikke ret meget.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Caerleon Roman Amphitheatre

Built around AD 90 to entertain the legionaries stationed at the fort of Caerleon (Isca), the impressive amphitheatre was the Roman equivalent of today’s multiplex cinema. Wooden benches provided seating for up to 6,000 spectators, who would gather to watch bloodthirsty displays featuring gladiatorial combat and exotic wild animals.

Long after the Romans left, the amphitheatre took on a new life in Arthurian legend. Geoffrey of Monmouth, the somewhat imaginative 12th-century scholar, wrote in his History of the Kings of Britain that Arthur was crowned in Caerleon and that the ruined amphitheatre was actually the remains of King Arthur’s Round Table.

Today it is the most complete Roman amphitheatre in Britain.