Old Town Hall

Ribe, Denmark

The old Town Hall of Ribe was built before 1496, and has been used as the town’s city hall from 1708 until 2007, when the last town councillor meeting was held. On the walls in old Commoner’s hall hang a collection of portraits of vassals and councillors from 1600-1900. The former debtor’s prison has been converted to a museum about the laws and statutes in Ribe. Stories are told about town halls, town gates and commerce. Here, you can see the town’s seal, standard dimensions, drinking cup, law book, and spiked mace, thumb screws and more.

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Details

Founded: 1496
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Denmark
Historical period: Kalmar Union (Denmark)

More Information

www.visitribe.com

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Karoline Löschner (2 years ago)
Der schönste Ort zum heiraten
Valen Tinchen (2 years ago)
Beautiful old building with very friendly personnel!
Susanne Lund (3 years ago)
Fantastisk flot og over 500 år gammel bygning. Der emmer af gamle dage.
Marianne Rømer (3 years ago)
God fortæller der kan sætte det hele i et nutidsperspektiv, sød og inspirerende fortæller.
Junaid baba (4 years ago)
In got married there and I love it
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