Näsby Castle

Täby, Sweden

Näsby estate belonged to Uppsala archbishop in 1300s and in 1520s it was donated to Kristina Nilsdotter (Gyllenstierna). In 1571 it was acquired by Gustav Axelsson Baner. Originally built in the 1660s and designed by Nicodemus Tessin the Elder, the current Näsby Castle is located in the picturesque and natural setting of Näsbyviken. The castle was burned to the ground in 1897, but was rebuilt according to the original design on the initiative of Carl Robert Lamm and Dora Lamm who moved into the castle in 1905. Parts of the old castle garden still exist and are well preserved. Today Näsby is a conference center with a hotel and restaurant.

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Details

Founded: 1660s
Category: Castles and fortifications in Sweden
Historical period: Swedish Empire (Sweden)

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mark Pheorize (19 months ago)
Beautiful castle, free WiFi, very comfy chairs in the conference room and a beautiful interior! The only drawback at the moment is that there's a worksite at the house next-door, so there's some mud on the road and parking lot, with some heavy trucks going in and out. But this isn't really the castle's fault and nothing that's noticeable from indoors, so I won't detract any stars from my score.
Snehangshu Datta (21 months ago)
Awesome place to have meeting and enjoy a bit of nature
Anna Maria Acking (2 years ago)
A very beautiful place with the best staff. I'd forgotten to say I was a vegetarian before the event but they fixed up a moat delicious salad for me on the spot.
Fred Hoffmann (2 years ago)
Have eaten here twice and the food is fantastic.
Mark Ellis (2 years ago)
Elegant building in pleasant rural setting.
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