Villa Mairea is a villa and guest house built in 1938-1939 as the residence of patronages Harry and Maire Gullichsen. It was designed by their friend, the most famous Finnish architect Alvar Aalto. The house is one of the most successful examples of the modernist style in architecture and one of Aalto's most widely known designs. The interior of the Villa mainly consists of modern art and Artek furniture, which form a very rare collection of Finnish and international art and design.

Currently, Villa Mairea is used for entertainment purposes by the Ahlström Corporation. It also accommodates the Mairea Foundation. Guided tours of the house can be booked from the Mairea Foundation: 
tel. +358 10 888 4460 or info@villamairea.fi.

Reference: Official Website

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Details

Founded: 1938-1939
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Finland
Historical period: Independency (Finland)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Nao (6 months ago)
Such a wonderful place! It is beautiful and the spirit of the house is incredibly warm and caring.
Neriman Sencer (6 months ago)
i fall in love the house
Gábor Sztanics (2 years ago)
A place I have always dreamed of. Amazing, beautiful.. a dream
Mikko Rintala (2 years ago)
Incredible Finnish architecture. Built in 1939, Villa Mairea was 30 years ahead of its time in many aspects. Guided tours available several days every week!
Sam Rimm-Kaufman (2 years ago)
Great architecture and beautiful interior but the staff is a bit rude, pushing our group out half an hour before our scheduled visit had ended. Also no interior photos allowed :(
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