Completed in the first half of the twelfth century, Hover Church is one of the oldest churches in Denmark. In 1771, the church's west gable was damaged by a storm. A heavy buttress now supports one wall. The porch was built in the 1500s in late Gothic style on the south side of the church, where the men's entrance once was. The women's entrance was on the north side of the church. The frescoes are dated to the 16th century. In 1907, a fresco was uncovered on the chancel arch wall depicting Isaac's sacrifice, possibly after a woodcut in Christian III's Bible. There were traces of earlier frescoes but they have now been covered with limewash. Restoration work was carried out in the 1960s.

Emulating the design of earlier wooden churches and standing on a sloping foundation, Hover Church is built of hewn granite in the Romanesque style. The nave is rectangular, thechancel is almost square, and the four simply-glazed windows are small and high. Unlike most other Danish churches, Hover does not have a bell tower, but instead has a small bell that hangs under an overhang on the east gable.

The church interior is very similar to other Danish churches. It has a pulpit, altar, baptismal font, organ and benches. It has a flat ceiling and a rounded chancel arch. The altar is of solid granite blocks while the altarpiece (late 17th century) displays a copy of the painting Vandringen til Emmaus by Anton Dorph (original in the Emmaus Church, Frederiksberg). The pulpit (1596) shows the four Evangelists, Matthew, Mark, Luke and John. The font is as old as the church itself. It was previously painted and later acid-washed. The organ (1968) was built by Frobenius Orgelbyggeri and is equipped with 8 votes distributed between one manual and pedal. One of the chair backs in the church has a motif with a crossbow with the date 1575.

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Address

Hovervej 97A, Spjald, Denmark
See all sites in Spjald

Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Denmark
Historical period: The First Kingdom (Denmark)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

3.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Hanne Rasmussen (6 months ago)
I had a good time, and wanted to visit Hover Church, which is at the forefront of the Danish architecture canon. Unfortunately that was closed. Corona ????? I went for a walk in the well kept cemetery.
Claus Jensen (9 months ago)
Beautiful old church
Kirsten Milling (14 months ago)
A very old church. One of the few without a tower. Romanesque block stone church. Exciting. Walled woman's door. In the cemetery dike by the doctor to the west carved bowl signs from the Bronze Age.
Poul Sig (16 months ago)
I am baptized confirmed in the cozy church
Peter Dyrby (3 years ago)
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