Château de Creully

Creully, France

Château de Creully has been modified throughout its history. Around 1050, it did not resemble a defensive fortress but a large agricultural domain. In about 1360, during the Hundred Years War, it was modified into a fortress. During this period, its architecture was demolished and reconstructed with each occupation by the English and the French: The square tower was built in the 14th century, a watchtower and drawbridge in front of the keep (removed later in 16th century) was added in the 15th century.

With the end of the war (1450), ownership of the castle returned to baron de Creully. It was demolished on the orders of Louis XI in 1461 through plain jealousy. According to legend, When Louis XI passed through Creully in 1471 he authorised its rebuilding to thank the local people for their warm welcome. In the 16th and 17th centuries, the barons made modifications like the construction of a Renaissance style turret and large windows. Outbuildings, originally stables, were added in 17th century.

22 barons of the same family had succeeded to the castle between 1035 and 1682. In 1682, the last baron of Creully, Antoine V de Sillans, heavily indebted, sold the castle to Jean-Baptiste Colbert, minister of Louis XIV, who died the following year without living there. Descendants of Colbert occupied Creully until the French Revolution in 1789, when it was confiscated and sold to various rich landowners.In 1946, the commune of Creully became the owner of part of the site. The castle's large halls are used today for various events, including weddings, concerts, exhibitions and conferences. The site is classified as a monument historique.

From 7 June 1944, the day after D-Day, until 21 July, the square tower housed the BBC war correspondents and their radio studio, whence the first news of the Battle of Normandy was transmitted. For some weeks in August 1944, Field Marshall Montgomery used the chateau as his headquarters. Prime Minister Churchill visited him there.

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Details

Founded: c. 1360
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

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4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

cécile explore (17 months ago)
Impressive medieval castle with well-kept gardens and free access outside and inside when occasional art exhibitions.
Blériot 53 (18 months ago)
An excellent place to visit, and a fascinating museum. We learned that the castle was used as a broadcasting station for the BBC during the second World War, and we were lucky enough to visit on a day when local radio-hams were putting on a demonstration from the very room. They were granted permission to festoon the tower with antennas just for the occasion.
cassio silva (20 months ago)
One of the most extraordinary strongholds in the Calvados region. It is known that it is composed of buildings from different eras, but nevertheless, it loses its charm. In the 14th century the English captured him, although Richard Creully partially dismantled him. Months later, the castle was recovered, and history tells us that the 100 Englishmen who were there, were killed or taken prisoner.
Steve Waters (2 years ago)
Looks lovely, very quirky. Grounds are free to wander in but chateau closed September.
Ken Elliott (2 years ago)
Very interesting, and unusual 'museum ' about the news reports from the Overlord landings. Who knew that this was the first place to get 'news' reports out!!
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