Pointe du Hoc is a promontory with a 30m cliff overlooking the English Channel. During World War II it was the highest point between Utah Beach to the west and Omaha Beach to the east. The German army fortified the area with concrete casemates and gun pits. On D-Day (6 June 1944) the United States Army Ranger Assault Group assaulted and captured Pointe du Hoc after scaling the cliffs.

Six French-made 155 mm howitzers dating from the First World War are set up on a plateau that ends abruptly in rocky cliffs.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 1944
Category:

More Information

en.wikipedia.org
www.abmc.gov

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

travelaxation (12 months ago)
It’s a really impressive, historically significant place! You get a lot of information about WWII.
Jason Miller (12 months ago)
I love the story of the bravery needed to climb this cliff in the midst of it all. The craters and bunkers are amazing to walk through. I remember looking at the nails in the wood and thinking about the Nazi who hammered it all those years ago. It's a historical marvel to walk though this place and can't be more highly recommended. I would use Bayeaux as your base for exploring all the beaches.
Troy Michalik (13 months ago)
Amazing place to visit. Take precautions, because it's windy! Fantastic walk through site with plenty of climbing and searching of bunkers, so wear good shoes.
Foodprints (13 months ago)
Despite the perfect weather, the atmosphere was heavy and solemn. The historical accounts of the battle and aftermath were detailed on various tablets on site, and one could almost hear the gunfire that once tore through the deadly two-day battle that killed and wounded hundreds of soldiers, including nearly two-thirds of the American landing force.
Evan Massie (13 months ago)
One of the better battery’s to visit. The views are amazing and between the remains of bunkers and shell impacts it gives you a better perspective of the challenges the allies overcame
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Kromeriz Castle and Gardens

Kroměříž stands on the site of an earlier ford across the River Morava. The gardens and castle of Kroměříž are an exceptionally complete and well-preserved example of a European Baroque princely residence and its gardens and described as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

The first residence on the site was founded by bishop Stanislas Thurzo in 1497. The building was in a Late Gothic style, with a modicum of Renaissance detail. During the Thirty Years' War, the castle was sacked by the Swedish army (1643).

It was not until 1664 that a bishop from the powerful Liechtenstein family charged architect Filiberto Lucchese with renovating the palace in a Baroque style. The chief monument of Lucchese's work in Kroměříž is the Pleasure Garden in front of the castle. Upon Lucchese's death in 1666, Giovanni Pietro Tencalla completed his work on the formal garden and had the palace rebuilt in a style reminiscent of the Turinese school to which he belonged.

After the castle was gutted by a major fire in March 1752, Bishop Hamilton commissioned two leading imperial artists, Franz Anton Maulbertsch and Josef Stern, arrived at the residence in order to decorate the halls of the palace with their works. In addition to their paintings, the palace still houses an art collection, generally considered the second finest in the country, which includes Titian's last mythological painting, The Flaying of Marsyas. The largest part of the collection was acquired by Bishop Karel in Cologne in 1673. The palace also contains an outstanding musical archive and a library of 33,000 volumes.

UNESCO lists the palace and garden among the World Heritage Sites. As the nomination dossier explains, 'the castle is a good but not outstanding example of a type of aristocratic or princely residence that has survived widely in Europe. The Pleasure Garden, by contrast, is a very rare and largely intact example of a Baroque garden'. Apart from the formal parterres there is also a less formal nineteenth-century English garden, which sustained damage during floods in 1997.

Interiors of the palace were extensively used by Miloš Forman as a stand-in for Vienna's Hofburg Imperial Palace during filming of Amadeus (1984), based on the life of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, who actually never visited Kroměříž. The main audience chamber was also used in the film Immortal Beloved (1994), in the piano concerto scene.