Pointe du Hoc is a promontory with a 30m cliff overlooking the English Channel. During World War II it was the highest point between Utah Beach to the west and Omaha Beach to the east. The German army fortified the area with concrete casemates and gun pits. On D-Day (6 June 1944) the United States Army Ranger Assault Group assaulted and captured Pointe du Hoc after scaling the cliffs.

Six French-made 155 mm howitzers dating from the First World War are set up on a plateau that ends abruptly in rocky cliffs.

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Founded: 1944
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More Information

en.wikipedia.org
www.abmc.gov

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Caitlin Schroeder (8 months ago)
Very interesting area, amazing views, and lots of history.
julian kaltenbrunner (9 months ago)
Very interesting for people who are interested in the history of WWII
Anouk Van Leeuwen (15 months ago)
Beautiful place and memorial, there aren't any places to sit which is a shame
Riky “lo/rez” Romei (16 months ago)
If you are in the area visit it,
Edward & Joanne H. (16 months ago)
Amazing the battle that was fought here and the lives that were sacrificed for our freedom today.
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