Château de Saint-Sauveur-le-Vicomte

Saint-Sauveur-le-Vicomte, France

Château de Saint-Sauveur-le-Vicomte was built in the 11th and 12th centuries. It was besieged twice during the Hundred Years War. The city walls were breached by cannon in 1374. This is believed to have been among the first successful uses of guns against city walls in history. Today it is partially ruined, but still a notable castle with massive 14th century towers and a 12-15th century abbey.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Ruins in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Alex Totti (5 months ago)
Majestic castle, but seems that very few people know it, so you can enjoy the peaceful view here.
Reto Merazzi (6 months ago)
The guided tour is great, without it there's not too much to see
Ramon Nipper (6 months ago)
Sadly the place is dead. Even the excellent campground is closed for most of the year. More shops are closed than open. The main restaurant hotel is lacking charm and ambiance. Its dead!
George Dyer (2 years ago)
It's a very historic monument with excellent information and signposting
Errol Menke (2 years ago)
Fun interesting times
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