Utah Beach was the successful landing place of a number of American Divisions on 6th June 1944, and from here they pushed inland to the Carantan peninsula to meet up with US Airborne forces around St Mere Eglise. Between D Day and 1st November 1944 some 836,000 men and 220,000 vehicles came ashore here. The beach also marks the point of 'Liberty Way' which runs from Normandy to Bastogne in Belgium, and is marked by a memorial stone every kilometer - the 00 Kilometer stone being here (with another in St Mere Eglise).

The Utah Beach Museum was originally opened in the 1960s and then renovated for the 50th Anniversary of D Day in 1994. It tells the story of the American landings at Utah and also the Airborne operations around St Mere Eglise. The museum has many rare vehicles, weapons, photographs and veterans artifacts. There is a good 1/35th scale model of the landings, and a film show. There is also a book shop.

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Founded: 1960
Category: Museums in France

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jason Henn (14 months ago)
Better than expected. A lot of detail and really well maintained show pieces. The 12 minute film was most informative. Definitely worth a visit. Highly recommended.
Ralph van Roosmalen (14 months ago)
A very nice museum. Focus on Utah beach, of course. There show a few films. The first one is definitely a must see. A professional and very nice movie.
Victor & Agnes Steenkist (14 months ago)
It surely is worth a visit. Nice Bach as well. If you have a dog, it is allowed onto the beach, but not in the museum.
Zsolt Völgyesi (15 months ago)
The location is a must to see as an important D-Day venue. Three years after my last visit, this place is still enchanting.
Pablo Martínez Díaz (17 months ago)
Excellent collection. War museum that treat with respect the memory of those that gave their lives. Must see the short film. Very informative. Flying fortress is impressive.
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