Château de Vendeuvre

Vendeuvre, France

Vendeuvre was built between 1750 and 1752 from the plans of architect Jacques-François Blondel and is a great example of a country house (maison de campagne) of the 18th century. Its owner, Alexandre Le Forestier, coming from a Cotentin family that claimed descent from the Counts of Flanders, wanted a modern summer retreat built in the style of the day. The old manor-house was demolished, as it was damp (it was closer to the Dives river-banks than the present building) and built partially into the hillside slope.

During the French Revolution, Alexander of Vendeuvre and his family lived at Rouen, their house at Caen having been burned down. As the family didn’t emigrate during the Revolution, the chateau was saved from destruction, thus preserving the original décor and most of the furnishings.

The château is famous for its 18th century interiors. Blondel paid particular attention to the highly sophisticated interior circulation and decoration. After the château was damaged during the Second World War, the present Count of Vendeuvre, a direct descendant of Alexander of Vendeuvre, set about the complete internal and exterior renovation of the chateau. The slate roof was re-laid in 1945. Following the completion of the interior renovation, the park’s restoration followed in 1970, using the original 1813 plans as a basis for the garden’s classic French style. In 1983 the Orangery was restored to its former state, having also been badly damaged as a result of action during the war.

In the presentation of the château, each room presents a theme of 18th century daily life. Automatons (mannekins with recordings) point out the salient features of each room, for example the dining room demonstrates the art of receiving and entertaining guests and the Grand Salon shows the pleasures of indoor games.

The chateau’s plan shows that it is twice as wide as it is deep, with a suite of state rooms distributed around a central hall supported by Ionic columns. The layout of the suites (each leads to the next) and the rounding of all the corners, help to spread the natural light throughout each room. The quality of the wood panelling in the main room is remarkable. The furniture is a comprehensive list of 18th century craftsmanship.

The formal gardens that have been created by the present Count of Vendeuvre, have a strictly symmetrical classical lay-out of closely clipped scrolling designs set against gravel reserves, and borders and box hedges set in lawns, with a formal water beyond, flanked by pollarded lime trees (lindens), against a background of mature woodlands. Beyond the sloping fields of the valley of the river Dives, the hills of the Pays d'Auge can be seen in the far distance.

Restored according to plans, of 1813, these French geometric gardens perfectly complement the equally symmetrical garden front of the château.

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Details

Founded: 1750-1752
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Peter Svensson (2 years ago)
Must see if you are in Normandie even for the kids. They will love the "water" garden. Take 3 to 4 hours for the visit.
Fabio Pasini (2 years ago)
Lovely castle, nice and curious exposition of tiny forniture. The garden is the top,well maintained,the surprise garden are so fun for kids,and we all love it.
Anthony Parkes (2 years ago)
A beautiful chateau but gardens are poorly kept and in need of a lot of work. The water features in the garden give it a unique feel it just needs better maintenance. House tour is only on ground floor but is well stocked with period furniture.
Helena Dron (2 years ago)
Great family day out. Very quirky interior and fabulous gardens. Kids loved the surprise garden with hidden water features. Definitely worth a visit.
Paul Almy (2 years ago)
Very interesting castle and gardens but the state of the gardens gives the impression things are going downhill. It would take an enormous amount of work to get things back to their original glory. Still worth the 11.50 to see it all. Give yourself about 3 hours.
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