Museum of Bayeux Tapestry

Bayeux, France

Musée de la Tapisserie de Bayeux is a museum dedicated to the famous Bayeux Tapestry. This hand-woven 70m long tapestry tells the story of William the Conqueror’s invasion of England in 1066. The manmade wonder of the 11th century has been well preserved, leaving the town of Bayeux only twice: once when Napoleon used it to show his troops that conquering England was indeed possible, and the second time during World War II, to save it from being damaged. Each year, the Tapestry Museum is visited by over 400000 visitors who marvel at the glass encased masterpiece.

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Category: Museums in France

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jared Boike (2 years ago)
Although its technically not a tapestry, its still a piece of history that we should cherish! Sadly you are not allowed to take photos NOR video???? Like why. Its already under lights and in an airtight container, I'm sure pictures wont hurt.
Jared Boike (2 years ago)
Although its technically not a tapestry, its still a piece of history that we should cherish! Sadly you are not allowed to take photos NOR video???? Like why. Its already under lights and in an airtight container, I'm sure pictures wont hurt.
Bob Jones (2 years ago)
It was a privilege to stand in front of this wonderful document. There was a commentary provided. Highlight of my trip. Recommended.
ian beswick (2 years ago)
Excellent value for money ... €5 entry. No photos allowed as expected though. So privileged to see the tapestry in person .... the quality and the detail of the work considering its hundreds of years old, and accompanied with a great personal audible guide.
Christian Markus (2 years ago)
Must see in Normandy - unfortunately for the visitor, this view is widely shared, so expect so queuing. The complimentary audioguide cannot be paused once activated, to ensure nobody lingers and everyone mives at the same speed. Optimized so as many visitors as possible can view the tapestry, but no chance to capture details, to move back to am earlier scene, or to just enjoy in a more leisurely fashion. Still a great experience.
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