Museum of Bayeux Tapestry

Bayeux, France

Musée de la Tapisserie de Bayeux is a museum dedicated to the famous Bayeux Tapestry. This hand-woven 70m long tapestry tells the story of William the Conqueror’s invasion of England in 1066. The manmade wonder of the 11th century has been well preserved, leaving the town of Bayeux only twice: once when Napoleon used it to show his troops that conquering England was indeed possible, and the second time during World War II, to save it from being damaged. Each year, the Tapestry Museum is visited by over 400000 visitors who marvel at the glass encased masterpiece.

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Category: Museums in France

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Alan A (20 months ago)
The Bayeux Tapestry is well worth a trip out of your way to see it. Liked the exhibits in the museum. Realize that when you go through the tapestry, you cannot stop the audio guide. So you have to keep walking. But the guide is really interesting. The town is also worth spending a few hours to walk through. See the church also.
Peter Prekopp (20 months ago)
Opening hours of the museum are unusual. The museum will shut one hour ( or two hours can't really remember ) for lunch. If you are interested in visiting the complete museum bear this in mind. The Tapestry part can be visited in less than an hour. Free audioguide provided. Photography not allowed ( if I only knew that ). The museum should reconsider opening hours. Nice souvenir shop
Stephen Harris (2 years ago)
Interested in historic items? This is for you! Well laid out with headphone audio narration whilst viewing the tapestry, this keeps everything orderly and keeps the queue moving effectively. Audio is clear, informative and available in your choice of language. Note, If you're British and making a special journey to view this, the French government have agreed to loan the tapestry to the UK in the very near future.
Angela Burt (2 years ago)
An amazing piece of art and history. Beautifully preserved given some of its uses over the years. Extremely well displayed at last, it's so much bigger than expected and the colours and details are exquisite. Such a fabulous record of events.
Fabrizio Iozzi (2 years ago)
Definitely a must! For historical reasons of course but mainly because this wonderful more than 70 meters long tapestry is beautiful. Every frame is a masterpiece of art from around 1066 and the figurines, the objects, the animals are colored and somehow naively depicted that you'll love them. The pace of the visit is a bit fast but this is due to the many visitors they have.
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