Château de Balleroy

Balleroy, France

Built in 1631 by the celebrated architect François Mansart (1598-1666) at the request of Jean de Choisy, the Château de Balleroy and its surrounding buildings are one of the first urban plans that inspired other chateaux, including Versailles. All the buildings were built from scratch. The chateau itself has retained almost all of its original features and it is because of this that it witnessed the major innovations of the 17th Century.

In 1970, Malcolm S. Forbes, owner of a major U.S. newspaper group acquired the chateau which was then fully restored and refurbished. Today, his four sons and his daughter continue his work.

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Details

Founded: 1631
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tabari Hinds (2 years ago)
A really wonderful castle.. you must visit.
S Draper (2 years ago)
Lovely grounds, didn't get into the castle
Chris Rees (2 years ago)
Beautiful place and amazing history told very well by the staff. The grounds are well looked after and very pleasant to have a walk around.
Stefan Campmans (2 years ago)
Interesting castle. It is a bit smaller than it looks. The new private owners had to redecorate it. Surprisingly enough, they chose to use hot air balloons as main theme. The visit was only possible with a tour in French and a booklet in English. If you are in the area, it is worth the visit
Kevin Holland (2 years ago)
We visited this Chateau in September 2017 and found the depth of history very interesting. The accompanied guide takes about 45 mins and is a available in most languages. Many important people have stayed at the Chateau, including a few Presidents and film stars alike. Well worth a visit if you are in the Normandy area
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