Beauport Abbey Ruins

Paimpol, France

Beauport Abbey was founded by Alain I of Avaugour in 1202. The heyday of abbey was in the 13-14th centuries and the late 17th century. It was closed down and destroyed during the Great Revolution in 1790. The abbey was sold as private property in 1797 and later to the community of Kérity. The restoration began in 1992 and today it is one of the most important attractions in Brittany.

The different buildings constructed in the 13th century were arranged around the cloister and followed the typical layout adopted by most abbeys of this period. This layout remains visible today. The guest hall, chapter house and cellars are prime examples of Gothic architecture.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 1202
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Late Capetians (France)

More Information

abbayebeauport.com

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Andrea Dellassette (2 years ago)
A very interesting place, full of hystory and art. The feelingd and atmosphere within the ancient walls are inspiring. To be seen.
Barrie New (2 years ago)
Lovely ruined abbey that we passed on a cycle tour. The cycle path is a not easy in this area.
Sylvain Dornadic (2 years ago)
This old Abbey was deserted during the French revolution and large portions or the buildings collapsed, including the roof of the church. Bought by a prominent family of Paimpol in the 19th century, the buildings were kept in the same state while the garden was carefully tended to enhance the romantic appeal of the Gothic ruins. The site itself, overlooking the coast is stunning under the sun and beautifully quiet in the fog that frequently shrouds it.
Davy Goris (2 years ago)
A little oase of silence, with great garden to walk and enjoy the nature surrounding it. There is also a trail towards the see, to a rocky beach. Entrance to the Abby is paying for adults, with discounts for children and families. There is specific attention to blind people, with some information in braille, and audio info.
Daauwe Van huizen (2 years ago)
Very fun and a very good price! Information in French, German, Dutch amd English and even fun things to do for kids! Overall a great experience and definetly worth the price!
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Derbent Fortress

Derbent is the southernmost city in Russia, occupying the narrow gateway between the Caspian Sea and the Caucasus Mountains connecting the Eurasian steppes to the north and the Iranian Plateau to the south. Derbent claims to be the oldest city in Russia with historical documentation dating to the 8th century BCE. Due to its strategic location, over the course of history, the city changed ownership many times, particularly among the Persian, Arab, Mongol, Timurid, Shirvan and Iranian kingdoms.

Derbent has archaeological structures over 5,000 years old. As a result of this geographic peculiarity, the city developed between two walls, stretching from the mountains to the sea. These fortifications were continuously employed for a millennium and a half, longer than any other extant fortress in the world.

A traditionally and historically Iranian city, the first intensive settlement in the Derbent area dates from the 8th century BC. The site was intermittently controlled by the Persian monarchs, starting from the 6th century BC. Until the 4th century AD, it was part of Caucasian Albania which was a satrap of the Achaemenid Persian Empire. In the 5th century Derbent functioned as a border fortress and the seat of Sassanid Persians. Because of its strategic position on the northern branch of the Silk Route, the fortress was contested by the Khazars in the course of the Khazar-Arab Wars. In 654, Derbent was captured by the Arabs.

The Sassanid fortress does not exist any more, as the famous Derbent fortress as it stands today was built from the 12th century onward. Derbent became a strong military outpost and harbour of the Sassanid empire. During the 5th and 6th centuries, Derbent also became an important center for spreading the Christian faith in the Caucasus.

The site continued to be of great strategic importance until the 19th century. Today the fortifications consist of two parallel defence walls and Naryn-Kala Citadel. The walls are 3.6km long, stretching from the sea up to the mountains. They were built from stone and had 73 defence towers. 9 out of the 14 original gates remain.

In Naryn-Kala Citadel most of the old buildings, including a palace and a church, are now in ruins. It also holds baths and one of the oldest mosques in the former USSR.

In 2003, UNESCO included the old part of Derbent with traditional buildings in the World Heritage List.