Château de Coat-an-Noz

Belle-Isle-en-Terre, France

Château de Coat-an-Noz was built between 1880-1884 by Countess Sesmaisons. Since her it has been owned by several families and is still in private use (but not restored).

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Details

Founded: 1880-1884
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jessica Violanti (15 months ago)
Sublime ... je suis totalement sous le charme du château et de son histoire.. Nous sommes tombés sur un ami du proprio qui nous a raconté l'histoire du château ❤
Annick LE CAM (16 months ago)
Belle restauration, dommage que les fenêtres ne soient pas encore posés.
Patricia Le Brigant (18 months ago)
Très beau coin - pas assez accessible
Hayden Taylor (20 months ago)
Amazing! we viewed it several times when it was for sale with the intention of doing the same thing to it but never committed, as we had a restoration on going in Callac just a short drive down the road and still live there now.. Amazing job you have done we drive over with only the intention to stop outside and admire often.
Nidia Maia (4 years ago)
It's in my bucket list !
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