Château de la Roche-Jagu

Ploëzal, France

Built in the 15th century on the site of an earlier medieval fort, the Gothic Château de la Roche-Jagu was much larger originally. The one main wing left standing has severe good looks. There are few openings of any sort on the side dominating the river, reflecting its defensive role. However, a staggering line of 19 chimneys in a row adds a decorative flourish along the crest of the building. The façade on the other side is much lighter and more charming, with a fair number of windows, plus an eccentric tower perched up high.

The building has undergone major restoration work since the Côtes d’Armor county council took it over and began putting on events here. The grand hall on the ground floor was where functions were traditionally held; exhibitions today focus on themes to do with Côtes d’Armor, for instance the county’s hidden treasures, or its maritime riches. The grounds have been beautifully replanted, and awarded the status of Jardin Remarquable. A wonderful new terrace looks down on the dramatic, densely wooded banks of the Trieux from on high.

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Address

D787, Ploëzal, France
See all sites in Ploëzal

Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

More Information

www.brittanytourism.com

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Daniël Tulp (16 months ago)
A nice castle with incredible gardens and very nice restaurant/tea-room. The visit inside the castle is nice, but not very interesting if you have seen other castles. But still, when you are here, you can always do it! The gardens on the other hand are very much worth your time visiting. Very divers and with a very nice walk showcasing it's splendor.
Jake Williams (18 months ago)
Great atmosphere, great statues with incredible views.
Justin Libby (2 years ago)
Pros: Chateau / castle with an interesting history. Beautiful views of the nearby river and countryside. Top floor has magnificent wooden beams. Kitchen fireplaces are 15 feet wide. Stone spiral staircases are fun. Cons: Price to enter is a bit steep. One of the restrooms was out of order when we visited. The art exhibits inside didn't really fit the space and were distracting from the castle history.
Charles Lales (2 years ago)
Nice historical place in this area. Were lucky to get modern art exhibition on plants hosted by the castle. Nice way to discover the garden, and you may find sweet stuff to eat / drink in cafeteria entrance.
Alan Clark (2 years ago)
Beautiful chateau in stunning grounds overlooking the estuary. We visited over the weekend of the flower festival and found entrance and parking to be free. Food was tasty and cheap. Recommended
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