Château de la Roche-Jagu

Ploëzal, France

Built in the 15th century on the site of an earlier medieval fort, the Gothic Château de la Roche-Jagu was much larger originally. The one main wing left standing has severe good looks. There are few openings of any sort on the side dominating the river, reflecting its defensive role. However, a staggering line of 19 chimneys in a row adds a decorative flourish along the crest of the building. The façade on the other side is much lighter and more charming, with a fair number of windows, plus an eccentric tower perched up high.

The building has undergone major restoration work since the Côtes d’Armor county council took it over and began putting on events here. The grand hall on the ground floor was where functions were traditionally held; exhibitions today focus on themes to do with Côtes d’Armor, for instance the county’s hidden treasures, or its maritime riches. The grounds have been beautifully replanted, and awarded the status of Jardin Remarquable. A wonderful new terrace looks down on the dramatic, densely wooded banks of the Trieux from on high.

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Address

D787, Ploëzal, France
See all sites in Ploëzal

Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

More Information

www.brittanytourism.com

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sue (2 years ago)
Beautiful gardens and view!
Dr Manan Soni (2 years ago)
Beautiful place with great wonders
Mark Tilling (2 years ago)
Excellent. Well worth a visit. Beautiful gardens and fine chateaux.
Jacqui Alban (3 years ago)
Definitely worth a visit. Spectacular views over the valley. The gardens are amazing with great planting and great ideas. Every year there is something new to see. Staff are very knowledgeable and really helpful. Good facilities for wheelchair users, although chateau is not accessible, the gardens and grounds are and are definitely worth visiting.
Katelyn Brenner (3 years ago)
The gardens here are absolutely incredible. The castle itself was interesting, but I would go here for the gardens alone. Unlike anything I have ever experienced in my life.
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