Château de la Roche-Jagu

Ploëzal, France

Built in the 15th century on the site of an earlier medieval fort, the Gothic Château de la Roche-Jagu was much larger originally. The one main wing left standing has severe good looks. There are few openings of any sort on the side dominating the river, reflecting its defensive role. However, a staggering line of 19 chimneys in a row adds a decorative flourish along the crest of the building. The façade on the other side is much lighter and more charming, with a fair number of windows, plus an eccentric tower perched up high.

The building has undergone major restoration work since the Côtes d’Armor county council took it over and began putting on events here. The grand hall on the ground floor was where functions were traditionally held; exhibitions today focus on themes to do with Côtes d’Armor, for instance the county’s hidden treasures, or its maritime riches. The grounds have been beautifully replanted, and awarded the status of Jardin Remarquable. A wonderful new terrace looks down on the dramatic, densely wooded banks of the Trieux from on high.

References:

Comments

Your name



Address

D787, Ploëzal, France
See all sites in Ploëzal

Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

More Information

www.brittanytourism.com

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Daniël Tulp (5 months ago)
A nice castle with incredible gardens and very nice restaurant/tea-room. The visit inside the castle is nice, but not very interesting if you have seen other castles. But still, when you are here, you can always do it! The gardens on the other hand are very much worth your time visiting. Very divers and with a very nice walk showcasing it's splendor.
Jake Williams (7 months ago)
Great atmosphere, great statues with incredible views.
Justin Libby (2 years ago)
Pros: Chateau / castle with an interesting history. Beautiful views of the nearby river and countryside. Top floor has magnificent wooden beams. Kitchen fireplaces are 15 feet wide. Stone spiral staircases are fun. Cons: Price to enter is a bit steep. One of the restrooms was out of order when we visited. The art exhibits inside didn't really fit the space and were distracting from the castle history.
Charles Lales (2 years ago)
Nice historical place in this area. Were lucky to get modern art exhibition on plants hosted by the castle. Nice way to discover the garden, and you may find sweet stuff to eat / drink in cafeteria entrance.
Alan Clark (2 years ago)
Beautiful chateau in stunning grounds overlooking the estuary. We visited over the weekend of the flower festival and found entrance and parking to be free. Food was tasty and cheap. Recommended
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Glimmingehus

Glimmingehus is the best preserved medieval stronghold in Scandinavia. It was built 1499-1506, during an era when Scania formed a vital part of Denmark, and contains many defensive arrangements of the era, such as parapets, false doors and dead-end corridors, 'murder-holes' for pouring boiling pitch over the attackers, moats, drawbridges and various other forms of death traps to surprise trespassers and protect the nobles against peasant uprisings. The lower part of the castle's stone walls are 2.4 meters (94 inches) thick and the upper part 1.8 meters (71 inches).

Construction was started in 1499 by the Danish knight Jens Holgersen Ulfstand and stone-cutter-mason and architect Adam van Düren, a North German master who also worked on Lund Cathedral. Construction was completed in 1506.

Ulfstand was a councillor, nobleman and admiral serving under John I of Denmark and many objects have been uncovered during archeological excavations that demonstrate the extravagant lifestyle of the knight's family at Glimmingehus up until Ulfstand's death in 1523. Some of the most expensive objects for sale in Europe during this period, such as Venetian glass, painted glass from the Rhine district and Spanish ceramics have been found here. Evidence of the family's wealth can also be seen inside the stone fortress, where everyday comforts for the knight's family included hot air channels in the walls and bench seats in the window recesses. Although considered comfortable for its period, it has also been argued that Glimmingehus was an expression of "Knighthood nostalgia" and not considered opulent or progressive enough even to the knight's contemporaries and especially not to later generations of the Scanian nobility. Glimmingehus is thought to have served as a residential castle for only a few generations before being transformed into a storage facility for grain.

An order from Charles XI to the administrators of the Swedish dominion of Scania in 1676 to demolish the castle, in order to ensure that it would not fall into the hands of the Danish king during the Scanian War, could not be executed. A first attempt, in which 20 Scanian farmers were ordered to assist, proved unsuccessful. An additional force of 130 men were sent to Glimmingehus to execute the order in a second attempt. However, before they could carry out the order, a Danish-Dutch naval division arrived in Ystad, and the Swedes had to abandon the demolition attempts. Throughout the 18th century the castle was used as deposit for agricultural produce and in 1924 it was donated to the Swedish state. Today it is administered by the Swedish National Heritage Board.

On site there is a museum, medieval kitchen, shop and restaurant and coffee house. During summer time there are several guided tours daily. In local folklore, the castle is described as haunted by multiple ghosts and the tradition of storytelling inspired by the castle is continued in the summer events at the castle called "Strange stories and terrifying tales".