Château de Tonquédec

Tonquédec, France

The Château de Tonquédec is one of the most visited monuments in the département of the Côtes d'Armor. The castle ruins with its several towers and a closed curtain wall is one of the most impressive French medieval sites. From the height of a rocky cliff it dominates the valley of the Léguer. It is a genuine vestige of feudal Brittany. The present castle was built in the 15th century, on the site of an earlier 12th-century castle (built by the Coëtmen-Penthièvre family). It was partially dismantled by order of Jean IV, Duke of Brittany, in 1395 because of a conflict between him and the Penthièvres. Indeed, Rolland II and Rolland III of Coëtmen, Viscounts of Tonquédec, had allied themselves to the rebellion of Olivier de Clisson.

Reconstruction began in 1406 by Rolland IV of Coëtmen. The castle subsequently changed owners several times, before becoming an artillery base in 1577. At this time, the owning family (Goyon de La Moussaye), being Protestant, was therefore in disagreement with the king, Henri IV. During the War of the League, the castle was a hiding place for Huguenots. It was finally dismantled around 1622 on the orders of the powerful Cardinal Richelieu.

The castle currently belongs to descendants of the original builders, House of Coëtmen-Penthièvre. The entrance gate leads to an outer fortified courtyard or basse-cour. Two towers, joined by a curtain wall, frame the entrance to the inner courtyard which is reached by a postern, once protected by a moat and drawbridge. The keep with walls 4m thick, stands detached from the curtain walls, at the rear of the ensemble. The ruins may be visited from April to October.

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Address

D113, Tonquédec, France
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Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Andrew Roberts (4 months ago)
It's a beautiful place and the people there take you back in history , with the reenactment of the way thing were done in the pass , thanks to all those men , women, boys and girls who give of there time to make it happen.
Keith Byner (6 months ago)
Good fun climbing up the stairs of the old castle. Good for kids who were dressing up in medieval costumes and sword fighting.
Joss Ross (7 months ago)
Tonquedec has so much history, the chateau ruins tell many stories, it's easy to imagine how life might have been there. The experience was made even better this afternoon with a medieval re- enactment being performed...
Wafaa El Husseini (9 months ago)
A nice castle to visit. The scenery is beautiful and worth checking out. A car is needed to reach it however. There's a walking trail around the castle which you should go on if you're there. The place is quite peaceful and the nature is just beautiful.
Mariusz Pawlaczyk (2 years ago)
lovely place
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