Daoulas Abbey Ruins

Daoulas, France

The buildings of former Daoulas Abbey - a cloister and a 12th century font, an oratory and a monumental 16th century fountain, together with the 18th century conventual house - are an exceptional tribute to Breton art from the 10th century onwards. It was established by Guyomarch IV de Léon in 1173, but there has been at least a church since the 6th century. The former abbey was raided and looted by Vikings.

Daoulas Abbey was secularized in 1771-1792 and moved as a private property. The abbey has been renowned since 1986 for the quality and originality of its archaeological, historical or ethnological exhibitions organised in collaboration with some of the most known world wide museums. The abbey houses a superb medicinal garden with over 250 species. It is still structured and organised like most middle age/renaissance convent or monastery gardens.

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Details

Founded: 1173
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Raul Buibas (16 months ago)
Beautiful and well organized place. Medicinal garden was really interesting. I visited during the pandemic and was pleased with the hygiene and thoughtfulness concerning distancing and protecting the visitors.
George Pipia (22 months ago)
Fascinating place! Would advise to visit it. Really nice job done by Abbey's gardeners!
guy fogwill (2 years ago)
Just the grounds worth a visit
Sarah Hepton (2 years ago)
Very nice. Would recommend a visit. Interesting exhibition and beautiful medicinal garden
Claire Martin (2 years ago)
Beautiful setting, loads of history and lovely old buildings, places to walk and eat.
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