Daoulas Abbey Ruins

Daoulas, France

The buildings of former Daoulas Abbey - a cloister and a 12th century font, an oratory and a monumental 16th century fountain, together with the 18th century conventual house - are an exceptional tribute to Breton art from the 10th century onwards. It was established by Guyomarch IV de Léon in 1173, but there has been at least a church since the 6th century. The former abbey was raided and looted by Vikings.

Daoulas Abbey was secularized in 1771-1792 and moved as a private property. The abbey has been renowned since 1986 for the quality and originality of its archaeological, historical or ethnological exhibitions organised in collaboration with some of the most known world wide museums. The abbey houses a superb medicinal garden with over 250 species. It is still structured and organised like most middle age/renaissance convent or monastery gardens.

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Details

Founded: 1173
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jeremy Issakieiwicz (2 years ago)
A visiter surtout pour son jardin. Expo à thème. Profitez en pour vous perdre dans le vieux Daoulas qui vaut le détour également.
C M (2 years ago)
Lovely interesting exhibition and beautiful garden
Matthias Verstraeten (2 years ago)
Nice garden and exhibition about hair. Quite new.
Bruce Berens (2 years ago)
At €7 per person entry, it was above our groups pay grade.
Gareth Davison (2 years ago)
So beautiful and so interesting in The most quaint french town. There is a cafe, gift shop and museum/gallery which was all really nice but the gallery exhibition was only in French which in our experience seems to be normal in this part of Brittany hence the 4stars. Still I couldn't recommend a visit hear enough especially to a gardener it's a dream day especially in early summer.
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