Horreby Church probably dates from the 12th century. Annexed to Falkerslev, it was set to be demolished in 1688 but the decision was retracted. It did however close in 1696 but was reopened the following year by order of the king.

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Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Denmark
Historical period: The First Kingdom (Denmark)

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4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tage Jensen (3 years ago)
Beautiful church
Kennet bo jensen (3 years ago)
Jørgen Bonde (4 years ago)
romywebb se (6 years ago)
Mycket vacker kyrkobyggnad med olika delar tillbyggd på en liten kulle. Trevlig och behaglig kyrkogård som ger en känsla av harmoni. På baksidan mot vägen finns en vacker port med fina stolpar. På sidan vid tornet finns en liten trappa ner från tomten till parkeringsplatsen.
romywebb se (6 years ago)
Very beautiful church building with different parts built on a small hill. Nice and comfortable cemetery that gives a sense of harmony. At the back towards the road there is a beautiful gate with nice posts. On the side of the tower is a small staircase down from the site to the parking lot.
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