Elmelunde Church

Stege, Denmark

Elmelunde Church is famous for its frescos. It stands high above the surroundings and the impressive whitewashed building can be seen from miles around and has been used as a landmark by sailors in the Baltic Sea. Elmelunde is the oldest church on the island of Møn, apparently constructed on a site where a wooden church once stood. The flat mound, to the north of the church, is even older. It is believed to be a heathen burial ground from the bronze age.

The present church dates back to 1085 when parts of the present choir and nave were built in the Romanesque style. Only the triumphal arch and the sidewalls remain from this period. The earliest additions were carried out around the year 1200 when the church was extended towards the west. Work on the tower began around 1300 but was not completed until 1500. The wooden ceiling was replaced by Gothic crossvaulting in 1462.

The church's many well-preserved frescos or kalkmalerier cover the Gothic vaulting of the nave and choir. Like the murals in two of Møn's other churches, Keldby and Fanefjord, they were painted in the Gothic style by the so-called Elmelunde Master, probably towards the end of the 15th century. In the so-called Biblia pauperum style, they present many of the most popular stories from the Old and New Testaments.

The paintings were hidden for centuries as, following the reformation, they were covered with layer after layer of limewash. In 1969, the National Museum of Denmark undertook major restoration work on the wall paintings. The vaults were cleaned, earlier restoration work was corrected and new frescos were revealed. The paintings in the nave and choir were discovered in 1885 and initially restored in 1895. During the most recent restoration work, it was found that the church had earlier been decorated with Romanesque frescos, traces of which could be seen on the walls of the nave and on the triumphal arch. However, until now, it has not been possible to restore them.

The most comprehensive wallpainting work was in fact carried out by the Elmelunde Master presenting a variety of scenes from the story of theCreation and the New Testament but also with illustrations of everyday activities such as ploughing and hunting. Between the paintings, margins with frills depicting flowers, plants and other ornaments can be seen. The figures all have sleepy faces, a characteristic of the Elmelund Master. Colours include black, ochre, caput mortuum, and cinnabar which has now faded to verdigris.

The richly carved altar, 1646, was a gift from King Christian IV´s daughter, Leonora Christina, and her husband Corfitz Ulfeldt. The central frame depicts the institution of the Holy Communion. The sides present the evangelists Mark and John. The pulpit, also a present from the Ulfeldts, is borne by the apostle Peter and is from the year 1649. Large representations of the four evangelists fill the larger frames while the corner frames house their symbols.

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Details

Founded: 1085
Category: Religious sites in Denmark
Historical period: The First Kingdom (Denmark)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Anne Stackebrandt (2 years ago)
Sehenswerte Kirche!
Tommy Hansson (2 years ago)
Historiesk Kirke med masser af kalkmalerier . Og gamle sømærke. Meget smukt
Darkmatter Yt (2 years ago)
Its Are cool place
Maarten Paraat (2 years ago)
Mooie kerk, rustig met heel oude muurschilderingen. Zeer de moeite waard.
Michael Sorms (2 years ago)
Schöne sehenswerte Kirche mit Kalkmalereien (vom so genannten Elmelund-Meister, der auch in der Keldby-Kirche und der Fanefjordkirche wirkte) und einem Holzaltar von 1637. Es ist eine der ältesten Steinkirchen Dänemarks und die älteste auf der Insel Møn. Auf dem gepflegten Friedhof befindet sich als Besonderheit noch ein Grabhügel aus der Bronzezeit.
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