Château de Kérouzéré

Sibiril, France

The Château de Kérouzéré is a Breton manor castle built in granite in the first half of the 15th century for Jean and Yves de Kérouzéré, seneschal of Morlaix, and followers of the dukes of Brittany. Visible from the sea, Kérouzéré was dangerously exposed and was particularly vulnerable to English attacks. As such the duke permitted him to erect a single tower of more than twenty-four feet in width with crenellations and ditches. This construction caused a major controversy with the neighboring seigneur of Kermorvan. As a result, from 1466 the building was always unfinished and, in 1468, François II had to grant a second authorization for its completion. The original tower is the part of the manor-house located to the west of the current entry (the window of the chapel sits above it).

It was besieged in 1590 during the French Wars of Religion and seriously damaged as the southeast tower was destroyed. It was rebuilt around 1600. There are four superimposed halls: the lowest hall is on the right of the entry and the upper-hall, arranged in the roof, gives access to the covered wall-walk. The kitchen, the common rooms and the private quarters, above, are directed towards the west. There were originally four corner towers; the moat, of which vestiges remained until the last century, has been filled in. The interior of the manor-house still has some 17th century wall paintings. The roof of the northwest tower was restored at the end of the 19th century.

Today visitors to the castle can still see the armoury, chapel, stairs, wall-walk and the watchman's tower with a view over the sea. There is also a 15th-century dovecote still standing on the grounds.

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Address

Kermaria 253, Sibiril, France
See all sites in Sibiril

Details

Founded: 1425-1458
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Clémentine Guérin (2 years ago)
Château majestueux et propriétaires très sympas . La visite guidée a été faite avec passion et dévotion par la fille des proprios . Le parc qui arbore le château est tout bonnement somptueux . Je recommande ++++
Clementine Guerin (2 years ago)
Château majestueux et propriétaires très sympas . La visite guidée a été faite avec passion et dévotion par la fille des proprios . Le parc qui arbore le château est tout bonnement somptueux . Je recommande ++++
Sophie de Calan (2 years ago)
My paradise on earth!!!!! Best place ever!
Lauren Norris (3 years ago)
Not a place to visit.
Ben Ben (3 years ago)
I'd recommend that all non-French visitors stay far, far away! The proprietress is aggressive and rude, especially since the signage and expectation of the property are not clearly explained to begin with. (It is a private home with people living in it, and only gives tours once a day.) It is not a welcoming site for tourists, and was the only negative experience we've had in Brittany. I've never been so suddenly, verbally attacked at a tourist destination for sitting on the ground in front of the castle. The woman said she wasn't surprised by our rudeness considering we were British. That we wouldn't have behaved like that if we were French (this was all while we were just trying to figure out what the issue was to begin with) and that we were ruining our children (who didn't speak to anyone while we were on the property). This castle was the only blight on our otherwise lovely trip to Brittany. Avoid it like the plague.
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