Opened in 1989, the Border Museum is located in the Immola Barracks. The museum houses a permanent exhibition which traces the history of Finland’s frontiers and that of the Border Guard itself. The exhibition also gives an insight into the life and work of border guards during the period following Finland’s independence (in 1917), in times of both war and peace.

The museum is open in summer, and at other times by prior arrangement.

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Address

Kivikatu 1, Imatra, Finland
See all sites in Imatra

Details

Founded: 1989
Category: Museums in Finland
Historical period: Independency (Finland)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Juha-Pekka Hanhisuanto (4 years ago)
Museo on ehdottomasti käymisen arvoinen paikka varsinkin sotahistoriasta kiinnostuneille ja miksei kaikille muillekin aiheesta kiinnostuneille. Rajavartiolaitoksen ja rajavartijoiden historia tähän päivään saakka tulee näyttelyssä hyvin esille. Parasta museokierroksella oli oppaan ammattitaitoinen tuntemus ja tietämys asiaansa. Olisin viihtynyt pitempäänkin ja kuunnellut mielelläni lisää tarinoita vuosien varrelta. Suosittelen!
Aarne Meijanen (4 years ago)
Mielenkiintoinen näyttely
Jouni Kontiainen (4 years ago)
Hyvä paikka!!
Ari Riikonen (4 years ago)
Mainio paikka mielenkiintoisine kokoelmineen.
Kari Kareinen (4 years ago)
Hyvä museo, kertoo hyvin rajan toiminnasta eri vuosikymmeninä.
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