Opened in 1989, the Border Museum is located in the Immola Barracks. The museum houses a permanent exhibition which traces the history of Finland’s frontiers and that of the Border Guard itself. The exhibition also gives an insight into the life and work of border guards during the period following Finland’s independence (in 1917), in times of both war and peace.

The museum is open in summer, and at other times by prior arrangement.

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Address

Kivikatu 1, Imatra, Finland
See all sites in Imatra

Details

Founded: 1989
Category: Museums in Finland
Historical period: Independency (Finland)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Juha-Pekka Hanhisuanto (4 months ago)
Museo on ehdottomasti käymisen arvoinen paikka varsinkin sotahistoriasta kiinnostuneille ja miksei kaikille muillekin aiheesta kiinnostuneille. Rajavartiolaitoksen ja rajavartijoiden historia tähän päivään saakka tulee näyttelyssä hyvin esille. Parasta museokierroksella oli oppaan ammattitaitoinen tuntemus ja tietämys asiaansa. Olisin viihtynyt pitempäänkin ja kuunnellut mielelläni lisää tarinoita vuosien varrelta. Suosittelen!
Aarne Meijanen (4 months ago)
Mielenkiintoinen näyttely
Jouni Kontiainen (7 months ago)
Hyvä paikka!!
Ari Riikonen (11 months ago)
Mainio paikka mielenkiintoisine kokoelmineen.
Kari Kareinen (15 months ago)
Hyvä museo, kertoo hyvin rajan toiminnasta eri vuosikymmeninä.
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