Valtionhotelli

Imatra, Finland

The Imatrankoski Rapids has been a famous tourist sight since the 18th century. For example Catherine the Great, the Empress of All the Russias, visited Imatra in July 1772. In 1892 the railway came to Imatra, which immediately shortened the journey from St. Petersburg and increased the influx of tourists. There were originally two wooden hotels used by Russian aristocracy, but but they had been destroyed in fires in the beginning of the 20th century.

The Grand Hotel Cascade d'Imatra (Valtionhotelli in Finnish) was opened in 1903. The huge jugend style castel hotel was designed by Usko Nyström and it represents the romantic medieval knight castle style (like the Neuschwanstein castle in Germany).

After Finland's independence in 1917, the Russians found themselves barred from crossing the border and the remote location of the Imatrankoski Rapids near the Russian border no longer held any attraction to Finnish tourists. The 1920s saw the construction of the Imatrankoski power station; after that, the rapids were allowed to surge free only for special shows.

Valtionhotelli was renovated to the original outfit in 1987. Today it functions as a Spa Hotel owned by Restel Oy.

Reference: Imatra Municipality

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Details

Founded: 1903
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Finland
Historical period: Russian Grand Duchy (Finland)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ville Reuna (2 years ago)
The place is, of course, exceptional. In addition I have to say that everything worked perfectly. The room was clean and in good condition, the staff was very helpful and smiling and also the breakfast was very good, regardless to the fact that we went to the breakfast half an hour before closing. We also got a late check-out (2PM) just by asking and with no extra cost. Five stars and a recommendation for everybody planning a trip around Imatra.
Anton N (2 years ago)
Room in the old house is a kind of magic.Breakfast is more than just good... It is recommended to book a table for dinner in advance
Niko Sipola (2 years ago)
Great historical atmosphere. Fine spa.
Martin Petříček (2 years ago)
Really good hotel with great spa. I have just heard AC (probably) whole night - that was enoying
Petros PAPAZOGLOU PAPAZOGLAKIS (2 years ago)
Nice located palace hotel. The palace, surrounding nature and the view of the rapids it's wonderful. The rooms are clean and spacious. BUT, the room provided was not the one we reserved. Had a couch instead of 3rd bed. The restaurant has limited food variety and very poor service. The spa is limited as well. Only two spa bathtubs and one very small pool. The breakfast it's quite nice but ends early at 9:30.
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