Valtionhotelli

Imatra, Finland

The Imatrankoski Rapids has been a famous tourist sight since the 18th century. For example Catherine the Great, the Empress of All the Russias, visited Imatra in July 1772. In 1892 the railway came to Imatra, which immediately shortened the journey from St. Petersburg and increased the influx of tourists. There were originally two wooden hotels used by Russian aristocracy, but but they had been destroyed in fires in the beginning of the 20th century.

The Grand Hotel Cascade d'Imatra (Valtionhotelli in Finnish) was opened in 1903. The huge jugend style castel hotel was designed by Usko Nyström and it represents the romantic medieval knight castle style (like the Neuschwanstein castle in Germany).

After Finland's independence in 1917, the Russians found themselves barred from crossing the border and the remote location of the Imatrankoski Rapids near the Russian border no longer held any attraction to Finnish tourists. The 1920s saw the construction of the Imatrankoski power station; after that, the rapids were allowed to surge free only for special shows.

Valtionhotelli was renovated to the original outfit in 1987. Today it functions as a Spa Hotel owned by Restel Oy.

Reference: Imatra Municipality

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Details

Founded: 1903
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Finland
Historical period: Russian Grand Duchy (Finland)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Josefina Martín Gaspar (5 months ago)
Next to Vuoksi river, former kings lodgings for leisure time.A must
Toni (6 months ago)
cool and beautiful from the outside. inside is a mystery to me
Jyrki Viherto (7 months ago)
Nice old hotel. Good location.
Juge Mäkinen (11 months ago)
Excellent historical hotel, worth visiting.
Jorge Córdova (2 years ago)
Service is good but food from the buffet breakfast cold improve a lot.
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