The church hill of Ruokolahti is situated in a beautiful site just near the Lake Saimaa. The wooden church was completed in 1854. The bell tower is perhaps the most well known building in Ruokolahti and it is also one of the oldest ones. This shingle-roofed bell tower was built by a local carpenter, Tuomas Suikkanen, who completed it in 1752.

Opposite to the bell tower is the Ruokolahti Parish Museum. It was founded in 1955 in a public granary built in 1861. There are about 2000 objects in the three-story building.

A guided tour in the church hill takes about an hour. A guide can be engaged through the Ruokolahti Tourist Office.

Reference: Ruokolahti Municipality

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Details

Founded: 1752-1861
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: The Age of Enlightenment (Finland)

More Information

www2.ruokolahti.fi

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Atro Juntunen (2 months ago)
Puinen kirkko.
krista bister (2 months ago)
Tunnelmallinen ja kaunis kirkko
Евгений Быченков (2 months ago)
Красивейшее место, сама церковь и пристройки + потрясающий вид. Жаль что приехал туда когда церковь была закрыта по этому про внутреннее убранство ничего сказать не могу
Ilkka Keränen (7 months ago)
Simo Häyhän haudalla vierailu. I salute...
Виктор Малышкин (7 months ago)
Попали сюда в первый раз и случайно. Поразила красота этих мест, чистота и добродушие местных жителей. Мы попали на какой-то праздник, не поняли... Но нас искренне пригласили в Кирху и мы увидели как там уютно и красиво. Услышали орган и пение хора.
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