The Church of the Three Crosses

Imatra, Finland

The Church of the Three Crosses (Vuoksenniska chruch), designed by academician Alvar Aalto, is architecturally an interesting building. Its slender, high belfry describes a down shot arrow. Instead of the altar painting there are three crosses. Among the 103 windows only two are identical. Aalto planned the church also for other activities in the parish besides services. Therefore the church can be divided into three parts. In the church there are seats for 800 persons. The windows and lightning are high up, which creates fascinating display of light and shadow. The Church of the Three Crosses was completed in 1957. The stained glass on the ceiling is as old as the church and also designed by Alvar Aalto.

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Details

Founded: 1957
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: Independency (Finland)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Valeria Azovskaya (11 months ago)
It’s worth to bike there and see the Church from the inside. Notice the opening hours, please, it has it’s own schedule.
Marianna Kukva (12 months ago)
Тихое приятное место
Alexey Astafev (13 months ago)
Фантастика
Arttu Natunen (15 months ago)
Ok
Марина Волкова (2 years ago)
Необычная архитектура для церкви. Строгое и лаконичное здание, внутри скорее похоже на звл заседаний. При нашем посещении не было ни души, но все открыто, можно посмотреть
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