National Gallery

Oslo, Norway

The National Gallery houses Norway's largest public collection of paintings, drawings and sculptures. The museum's central attractions include Edvard Munch's The Scream and Madonna and paintings by Cézanne and Manet. The museum's exhibitions present older art, with principal emphasis on art from Norway. The permanent exhibition shows highlights from the collection and national icons from the romantic period until the mid-1900s. Also on display are works by international painters and sculptors, including the French impressionists.

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Address

Universitetsgata 13, Oslo, Norway
See all sites in Oslo

Details

Founded: 1842
Category: Museums in Norway

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Joyce Tang (3 years ago)
I feel like this museum is more suited to architecture students and those who have a keen interest in architecture; I found the exhibits quite dry, with very dense with technical information. If you visit the National Gallery of Oslo you are able to enter this museum for free. We visited the museum late in the afternoon so we didn't have much time to slowly browse, but it turns out there were only two permanent showrooms currently open anyway. That being said, there is a very small but lovely temporary exhibit on Le Corbusier, which displays the artist and architect's abstract art. This room was my favourite part of the museum. The exhibition discussing Oslo's future plans for building was more enlightening, but I don't think I'd pay to enter this museum if it was required.
Mirna Snijders (3 years ago)
Nothing very special, in my opinion not worth your time. Afterwards I understood why the ticket was only €5. The changing architecture of different apartment complexes was nice to see, but I expected to learn more about the architecture of for example the opera building located in Oslo and other iconic buildings in Oslo and Norway in general. The museum had nothing of that
Unnamed Muffin (3 years ago)
If this museum is a representation of the Norwegian architecture, then Norwegian architecture is a joke. Apparently, the national museum of the country cannot muster more than two tiny exhibition rooms and a theater playing nonsense. The staff demands you to leave your belongings in the locker, yet there are barely a dozen of them in the building. If there isn't an available locker, you're screwed. Save your money and go somewhere more intellectually rewarding, like literally any other museum in the city.
Jan Pytela (3 years ago)
A great place to stop by if you want to know more about the problems of housing in big cities. No admission - it's included in the NatMus ticket (that you for example get in the National Gallery). The main exhibition is just in one room full of light, so it's easy to navigate and feels natural. You can just walk through in 5-10 minutes, or you can spend 35 minutes there and you'll see everything what's there, so that makes it a nice stop if you find yourself in that area.
Trym Skaug Johannesssen (3 years ago)
Some day you gonna wonder about the history of a random buildings in Oslo? This is the place to get your head straight.
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The Palazzo Colonna is a palatial block of buildings built in part over ruins of an old Roman Serapeum, and has belonged to the prestigious Colonna family for over twenty generations.

The first part of the palace dates from the 13th century, and tradition holds that the building hosted Dante in his visit to Rome. The first documentary mention notes that the property hosted Cardinal Giovanni and Giacomo Colonna in the 13th century. It was also home to Cardinal Oddone Colonna before he ascended to the papacy as Martin V (1417–1431).

With his passing, the palace was sacked during feuds, and the main property passed into the hands of the Della Rovere family. It returned to the Colonna family when Marcantonio I Colonna married Lucrezia Gara Franciotti Della Rovere, the niece of pope Julius II. The Colonna"s alliance to the Habsburg power, likely protected the palace from looting during the Sack of Rome (1527).

Starting with Filippo Colonna (1578–1639) many changes have refurbished and create a unitary complex around a central garden. Architects including Girolamo Rainaldi and Paolo Marucelli labored on specific projects. Only in the 17th and 18th centuries were the main facades completed. Much of this design was completed by Antonio del Grande (including the grand gallery), and Girolamo Fontana (decoration of gallery). In the 18th century, the long low facade designed by Nicola Michetti with later additions by Paolo Posi with taller corner blocks (facing Piazza Apostoli) was constructed recalls earlier structures resembling a fortification.

The main gallery (completed 1703) and the masterful Colonna art collection was acquired after 1650 by both the cardinal Girolamo I Colonna and his nephew the Connestabile Lorenzo Onofrio Colonna and includes works by Lorenzo Monaco, Domenico Ghirlandaio, Palma the Elder, Salviati, Bronzino, Tintoretto, Pietro da Cortona, Annibale Carracci (painting of The Beaneater), Guercino, Francesco Albani, Muziano and Guido Reni. Ceiling frescoes by Filippo Gherardi, Giovanni Coli, Sebastiano Ricci, and Giuseppe Bartolomeo Chiari celebrate the role of Marcantonio II Colonna in the battle of Lepanto (1571). The gallery is open to the public on Saturday mornings.

The older wing of the complex known as the Princess Isabelle"s apartments, but once housing Martin V"s library and palace, contains frescoes by Pinturicchio, Antonio Tempesta, Crescenzio Onofri, Giacinto Gimignani, and Carlo Cesi. It contains a collection of landscapes and genre scenes by painters like Gaspard Dughet, Caspar Van Wittel (Vanvitelli), and Jan Brueghel the Elder.

Along with the possessions of the Doria-Pamphilij and Pallavacini-Rospigliosi families, this is one of the largest private art collections in Rome.