St. Edmund's Church

Oslo, Norway

St. Edmund's Church was built in 1883-84, and is home to the Norwegian congregation of the Church of England. Queen Maud used to visit this church, and there is a bust of her in the church, which otherwise is adorned with stained glass windows.

The church has modest size. While churches often dominate their surroundings and towers stretches over neighboring buildings, is this church modestly squeezed between larger buildings. It is said however that it came more into its own after some old buildings around it were demolished.

The church has - despite its small size - the shape of a cathedral. It was designed by architect Paul Due and Bernhard Steckmest and is in yellow and red brick in a simple, neo-Gothic style. The church was restored in 1990, and the tower was then replaced with a new one of roughly the same shape and size as the original.

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Address

Møllergata 30, Oslo, Norway
See all sites in Oslo

Details

Founded: 1883-1884
Category: Religious sites in Norway

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jill Almvang (2 years ago)
Eucharistic service in English every Sunday at 11 a.m. All are very welcome. Coffee/tea afterwards......
Arlene A. Henry (2 years ago)
Lovely church with English service. Very helpful for those who dont know Norwegian.
Belinda Walker (2 years ago)
Friendly place. Good option for English speakers in central Oslo
Maureen Robinson (3 years ago)
My church from childhood.
federico iannaccone (3 years ago)
Nice little church old building built in late eighties with bright coloured bricks today's is Anglican congregation not fare from public garden
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