Viking Ship Museum

Oslo, Norway

The main attractions at the Viking Ship Museum are the Oseberg ship, Gokstad ship and Tune ship. Additionally, the Viking Age display includes sledges, beds, a horse cart, wood carving, tent components, buckets and other grave goods. Many fully or nearly fully intact Viking ships are on display. Its most famous ship is the completely whole Oseberg ship.

In 1913, Swedish professor Gabriel Gustafson proposed a specific building to house Viking Age finds that were discovered at the end of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th century. The Gokstad and Oseberg ships had been stored in temporary shelters at the University of Oslo. An architectural contest was held, and Arnstein Arneberg won. The hall for the Oseberg ship was built with funding from the Parliament of Norway, and the ship was moved from the University shelters in 1926. The halls for the ships from Gokstad and Tune were completed in 1932. Building of the last hall was delayed, partly due to the Second World War, and this hall was completed in 1957. It houses most of the other finds, mostly from Oseberg.

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KH said 3 years ago
The Viking Ship Museum is an amazing place to visit! As soon as you open the door you see the beautiful Oseberg ship which only begins to show the unbelievable craftsmanship of the Vikings. I visited Norway with a friend and it was the very first thing that I wanted to see and it was worth it!!


Address

Langviksveien 5, Oslo, Norway
See all sites in Oslo

Details

Founded: 1926
Category: Museums in Norway

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Robert Shaughnessy (2 years ago)
Great place to visit if in Oslo. 25 min bus ride from City centre. There are 3 authentic preserved viking ships, which were previously buried in order to transport their deceased occupants to the afterlife. The bones of the dead and other items buried with the ships can also be seen. A real taste of Viking history.
ICU81MI (2 years ago)
Parking is plentiful. They have a small side building to the left to store bags if you need it. They have guides on the museum in many languages. The displays are impeccable. The historical facts are astounding, especially to have photos of the excavations. You cannot spend enough time here. The hand carved ships, the details on some of the artifacts. Truly a wonder to behold.
Lou Stone (2 years ago)
What a gorgeous museum! Remarkably preserved Viking ships and findings with incredible details, and a delightful short film running throughout to immerse yourself in. Accessible by bus, worth the ride out. If you bring a bag unless it's tiny you'll need to leave it in one of the free lockers.
Radu Paul Mihail (3 years ago)
One of my acquaintances recommended I visit this museum. While small, there are quite a few cool things to see and learn about the Vikings. This ticket is also valid for another museum, so I recommend going earlier in the day. Easy to get to by bus from city center. I recommend!
Lawrence Ortiguerra (3 years ago)
Super amazing to see these ships dug up and reassembled for all to see. It was really easy to get to by public transportation as well. We were staying in downtown Oslo and just caught a bus to the museum. The surrounding area was also beautiful, especially since we just had snow fall the previous night.
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