St. Clement's Church Ruins

Oslo, Norway

St. Clement's Church or Klemet's Church was one of the Roman Catholic parish churches of the old Oslo. It was a stone church with a tower, and it was one of the very few churches we know with the double-nave floor plan. Along the middle axis of the choir there were three powerful pillars that held the roof. The church went out of use after the Protestant Reformation, and expect it rather quickly was in ruins.

The church was exposed and examined through excavation by arcitect Johan Adolf Gerhard Fischer in 1921. Then remained for years unnoticed during Loeng bridge. In 1970-71 was archaeologist Ole Egil Eide opportunity to dig further into the ground under the church, and found traces of burials older than the stone church, 81 in all. His interpretation is that there have been at least two churches, presumably stave churches, on the spot where the stone church was built around 1100. The oldest of the graves are dated to the radiological 980-1030, and were some of the oldest Christian burials found in Norway. Ruins of Clement's Church is now exposed and is included as part of Middelalderparken in the Old Town of Oslo.

References:

Comments

Your name



Address

Saxegaardsgata 11, Oslo, Norway
See all sites in Oslo

Details

Founded: c. 1100
Category: Ruins in Norway

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Amphitheatre of the Three Gauls

The Amphitheatre of the Three Gauls was part of the federal sanctuary of the three Gauls dedicated to the cult of Rome and Augustus celebrated by the 60 Gallic tribes when they gathered at Lugdunum (Lyon). The amphitheatre was built at the foot of the La Croix-Rousse hill at what was then the confluence of the Rhône and Saône.

Excavations have revealed a basement of three elliptical walls linked by cross-walls and a channel surrounding the oval central arena. The arena was slightly sloped, with the building"s south part supported by a now-vanished vault. The arena"s dimensions are 67,6m by 42m. This phase of the amphitheatre housed games which accompanied the imperial cult, with its low capacity (1,800 seats) being enough for delegations from the 60 Gallic tribes.

The amphitheatre was expanded at the start of the 2nd century. Two galleries were added around the old amphitheatre, raising its width from 25 metres to 105 metres and its capacity to about 20,000 seats. In so doing it made it a building open to the whole population of Lugdunum and its environs.