Norwegian Folk Museum

Oslo, Norway

Norsk Folkemuseum, the Norwegian Museum of Cultural History, is a museum of cultural history with extensive collections of artifacts from all social groups and all regions of the country. It also incorporates a large open air museum with more than 150 buildings relocated from towns and rural districts.

Norsk Folkemuseum was established in 1894 by librarian and historian Hans Aall (1867-1946). It acquired the core area of its present property in 1898. After having built temporary exhibition buildings and re-erected a number of rural buildings, the museum could open its gates to the public in 1901. In 1907 the collections of King Oscar II on the neighbouring site was incorporated into the museum. Its five relocatd buildings, with the Gol stave church in the centre, is recognized as the world's first open air museum, founded in 1881.

Among the open air museum's more significant buildings are Gol stave church from the 13th century which was incorporated into the Norsk Folkemuseum in 1907. The Gol Stave Church is one of five medieval buildings at the museum, which also includes the Rauland farmhouse (Raulandstua) from the 14th century, and the 1865 tenement building relocated from 15 Wessels gate in Oslo. Seven of the nine flats show typical interiors from various periods of the 19th and 20th centuries, including a flat inhabited by an immigrant family from Pakistan as it was furnished in 2002. In 1951, the Sami collections in the Ethnographic Museum of the University of Oslo were transferred to the Norsk Folkemuseum.

The museum also possesses a large photographic archive, including a significant portion of the works of Anders Beer Wilse. In 2004, the administration of the adjacent Bygdøy Royal Estate was transferred to the museum. Throughout its existence, research has focused on building and furniture, clothing and textiles, technical and social culture, agriculture, working memory and Sami culture.

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Address

Museumsveien 10, Oslo, Norway
See all sites in Oslo

Details

Founded: 1894
Category: Museums in Norway

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Krishna Char (10 months ago)
The museum provides an overview of the cultures from different parts of Norway. It also has takes you on a journey through time. It was really interesting but museum is quite huge and took as around 3 hours to finish seeing all the important exhibits and you'll be spending even longer if you want to read the description for each exhibit. The highlight was obviously the wooden stave church from the 12th century.
Anne Nogva (11 months ago)
Beautiful place! Nice atmosphere. I have come here several times. Always something new to see and learn. Outdoor and indoor exhibitions.
Tavishi Matthews (13 months ago)
Amazing place with actual historical buildings gathered together from various locations in Norway. Stepping inside Norwegian homes from hundreds of years ago is a wonderful and eye-opening experience. They had guides dressed in traditional outfits who were there to offer additional information and answer questions. Awesome experience! Afterwards I felt that I had travelled back in time.
TUULA-RIITTA ROSSI ENGELSEN (13 months ago)
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Jackie Orr (13 months ago)
A bit of a disappointment to be truthful, not a lot of information available and you can't see in most of the buildings, so it didn't really give much insight into anything. Some of the buildings were beautiful and I enjoyed old Oslo part, but otherwise I don't think it was worth the entrance fee.
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