Urnes Stave Church

Ornes, Norway

The stave churches constitute one of the most elaborate types of wood construction which are typical of northern Europe from the Neolithic period to the Middle Ages. Christianity was introduced into Norway during the reign of St Olav (1016-30). The churches were built on the classic basilical plan, but entirely of wood. The roof frames were lined with boards and the roof itself covered with shingles in accordance with construction techniques which were widespread in Scandinavian countries.

Among the roughly 1,300 medieval stave churches indexed, about 30 remain in Norway. Some of them are very large, such as Borgund, Hopperstad or Heddal churches, whereas others, such as Torpo or Underdal, are tiny. Urnes Church was selected to represent this outstanding series of wood buildings for a number of reasons, which make it an exceptional monument:Its antiquity: This church, which was rebuilt towards the mid-12th century, includes some elements originating from a stave church built about one century earlier whose location was revealed by the 1956-57 excavations.

The exemplary nature of its structure: This is characterized by the use of cylindrical columns with cubic capitals and semicircular arches, all of which use wood, the indigenous building material, to express the language of stone Romanesque architecture.

The outstanding quality of its sculpted monumental decor: On the outside, this includes strapwork panels and elements of Viking tradition taken from the preceding building (11th century). In the interior is an amazing series of 12th-century figurative capitals that constitute the origin of the Urnes Style production.

The wealth of liturgical objects of the medieval period: This includes Christ, the Virgin and St John as elements of a rood beam, a pulpit of sculpted wood, enamelled bronze candlesticks, the corona of light, etc.

Excellent conservation of a perfectly homogeneous ensemble: The embellishment of the 17th century (1601 and c. 1700) and the restorations of 1906-10 preserved its authenticity completely.

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Address

Fylkesveg 331 390, Ornes, Norway
See all sites in Ornes

Details

Founded: c. 1130
Category: Religious sites in Norway

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Semund Simensen (14 months ago)
The oldest Stave Church in the world with beautiful carvings and an amazing view
Lars Börjesson (15 months ago)
This is a goldnugget! Don’t miss.
John Korecki (16 months ago)
Amazing place to see and highly recommended. Views of the surrounding fjord are incredible. Plenty of other reviews go into the history, I'll simply say that this should be seen once in your life. That stated, the climb from the ferry was about 400ft over a mile, so be prepared.
mirza rashed nawaz (16 months ago)
The old portal (c. 1130) in the northern wall of Urnes Stave Church in Norway. "By the 11th century Christianity had spread to Norway but the "Christianization" of these Viking folks was slow, taking at least a century or more. The Christian stave church at Urnes , Norway (1050-1070) with the Viking carvings of intertwining animals, bears witness to pagan Influence.way." "
Christina Löfberg (3 years ago)
A incredible place! I wasn't so impressed of the church but the surrounding is breathtaking. I really recommend you to go to this place!
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