Vangen Church

Aurland, Norway

Vangen Church was built in 1202 or 1280 depending the reference. It was built by an ancient family who lived in Aurland in the Viking Age and Middle Ages. The church is built in the early Gothic style influenced by English architecture. A document written in 1714 tells us that the English merchants used to stay in Aurland during long periods to buy different articles and they are supposed to have taken part in the building of the church. Most likely they would have been the master builders.

In 1725, the Danish-Norwegian government was experiencing financial problems and King Frederick IV sold the church. The church remained as private property until the late 19th century. Then the municipality bought Vangen church back for 500 kroner.

The pulpit dates back to the 17th century, the two candlesticks on the altar date from 1637. At the last restoration in 1926, the original colors and designs were uncovered. Then the ceiling was taken away and the baldachin over the pulpit was brought back again. A new altarpiece was made. The Norwegian artist Emanuel Vigeland made the stained glass windows (two of the windows in the chancel illustrate the Parable of the Prodigal Son, and the one in the middle is Jesus Christ, the Savior).

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Address

Vangen 3, Aurland, Norway
See all sites in Aurland

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Norway

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Alex Zoz (9 months ago)
Ancient church with Gothic elements. Picturesque bell tower at the cemetery - pay attention!
Jimmy Tilborghs (2 years ago)
Worth visiting. Nice wood structure.
Maciej Chrenowicz (5 years ago)
Very nice church with a cemetery.
Abd Alrahman Abduljawad (5 years ago)
The archaeological temple the beauty of the place is wonderful
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