Karljohansvern

Horten, Norway

Karjohansvern was the main base for the Royal Norwegian Navy from 1819 to 1963. It was the site of the Navy Main Yard, Navy Air Plane Factory, Navy Museum, Navy Schools and the forts Norske Løve andCitadellet.

Naval District East (ØSD) based there was disbanded in 2002. The Museum, the Royal Norwegian Navy Band, a department of theNorwegian Defence Research Establishment and some of the Navy's school administration is still present. As of 2006 the entire base including 73 buildings has been given protected heritage status by the Directorate for Cultural Heritage in Norway. Karljohansvern is open to the public. Only Vealøs is still owned by the Department of Defence.

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Address

Nedre vei 30, Horten, Norway
See all sites in Horten

Details

Founded: 1819
Category: Castles and fortifications in Norway

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

johs seeberg (3 months ago)
Fantastic place with a lot of Norwegian history.
Norse Wolf (6 months ago)
The maritime museum is well worth a visit. You can even learn about our traditional enemies, the Brits, and all the damage they have done us.
Rune Johansen (9 months ago)
Great place, lots of naval and technical history in the architecture and location.
Kenneth Rustad (11 months ago)
Nice place to relax and to refresh some history lessons.
Frank Burns (14 months ago)
Interesting place, you can see submarine outside, marine canons, fighting boat, lot of info panels, especially in these Corona times.
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Varberg Fortress

Varberg Fortress was built in 1287-1300 by count Jacob Nielsen as protection against his Danish king, who had declared him an outlaw after the murder of King Eric V of Denmark. Jacob had close connections with king Eric II of Norway and as a result got substantial Norwegian assistance with the construction. The fortress, as well as half the county, became Norwegian in 1305.

King Eric's grand daughter, Ingeborg Håkansdotter, inherited the area from her father, King Haakon V of Norway. She and her husband, Eric, Duke of Södermanland, established a semi-independent state out of their Norwegian, Swedish and Danish counties until the death of Erik. They spent considerable time at the fortress. Their son, King Magnus IV of Sweden (Magnus VII of Norway), spent much time at the fortress as well.

The fortress was augmented during the late 16th and early 17th century on order by King Christian IV of Denmark. However, after the Treaty of Brömsebro in 1645 the fortress became Swedish. It was used as a military installation until 1830 and as a prison from the end of the 17th Century until 1931.

It is currently used as a museum and bed and breakfast as well as private accommodation. The moat of the fortress is said to be inhabited by a small lake monster. In August 2006, a couple of witnesses claimed to have seen the monster emerge from the dark water and devour a duck. The creature is described as brown, hairless and with a 40 cm long tail.