Hoff stone church was built in the 12th century. Hoff church is similar in construction to the old cathedrals at Hamar, Nikolai Church in Gran, Old Aker Church, and Ringsaker Church. The joint model for these churches was the historic Hallvards Cathedral, the main church of medieval Oslo. After 1658, Hallvards Cathedral was demolished with only ruins left of the former cathedral in Oslo.

Hoff stone church was built of limestone. The church has been restored several times, including 1508, 1703 and lastly in 1952. The remodel in 1703 resulted in structural changes. The entire tower and the nave were removed and aisles walls built higher.

The church has a distinctive collection of paintings dating from the late 17th century. The church has a gallery and a total of 332 seats. It is known for its excellent acoustics and is often used for concerts. Hoff Church is associated with the Church of Norway, Østre Toten Parish Council of the Diocese of Hamar which covers Oppland and Hedmark.

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Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Norway

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en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Frode Lundhagebakken (18 months ago)
Totens fineste kirke!
Bine Ni (2 years ago)
Vi har opplevd blant annet mange stemningsfulle julegudstjenester i denne praktfulle kirken. Men julaften 2018 var vi skuffet. Det var verken stemningsfull eller noe for hele familien. Det var for mye elektrisk lys og for mindre julepynt. Dessuten fant bare lite folk veien til kirken i motsetning til mange andre gudstjenester før. For vår del fant presten ikke tonen med menigheten og deres familien. Neste år må vi dessverre finne en annen kirke for å være med i julegudstjenesten.
Ola Snoen Løvstad (2 years ago)
Middelalderkirke
Tore Laugen Vestnes (2 years ago)
Massiv
john ø sollie (3 years ago)
Norges peneste kirke ⛪
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