Haslum Church

Bærum, Norway

Haslum church was built in c. 1190 in Romanesque style. It is possible that it was built by Cistercian monks who also built Halvard Cathedral in Oslo. The original long nave was altered to cross shape in the 1200s. In 1300 there were 12 altars in the church. Haslum church was reconstructed in 1853 and restored to the medieval appearance in 1924.

The wooden statues of the Virgin Mary and the Bishop are copies of medieval originals that have been moved to the Antiquities Collection at the University of Oslo. The Renaissance altarpiece (1631) and pulpit (1590-1642), as well as the baroque baptismal font (1736) are worth of seeing. The paintings on the ceiling were executed by Axel Revold in 1920.

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Address

Kirkeveien 143, Bærum, Norway
See all sites in Bærum

Details

Founded: 1190
Category: Religious sites in Norway

More Information

www.mytravelguide.com

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Feike Witlam (10 months ago)
Impressive Ceremony for Confirmation of younsters on September 2.2023
Melwin Ambatt (4 years ago)
A church with 800 years of history
Abdul Hamid (5 years ago)
So nice - :)
Tytti Majanen (5 years ago)
Didn't found the geocache, which is located there.
Sig Bra (5 years ago)
A really beautiful medieval stone church. Small but very romantic. A favoured spot amongst locals for weddings.
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