Yelizarov Convent

Pskov, Russia

Yelizarov or Yeleazarov Convent is a small convent founded as a monastery in 1447 by a local peasant named Eleazar. He constructed the wooden church of Three Holy Fathers, wherein he was interred upon his death on 15 May 1481. Eleazar was canonized at the Stoglavy Sobor in 1551.

In the mid-16th century, the monastery was heavily fortified and attained a position of great importance and celebrity, owing to its learned hegumen, Philotheus of Pskov, who is credited with authorship of the Legend of the White Cowl and the Third Rome prophecy. It was during his hegumenship that the monastery became known for its school of icon-painters and its still-standing cathedral was built. Some scholars believe that the only known copy of the Lay of Igor's Campaign was created by one of local monks at the behest of Philotheus.

After seven decades of Soviet neglect, the monastery was revived as a nunnery patronized by Lyudmila Putina and Lyubov Sliska who commissioned a luxurious guest house for their prolonged stays at the convent.

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Address

Р60, Pskov, Russia
See all sites in Pskov

Details

Founded: 1447
Category: Religious sites in Russia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Дмитрий Степанов (9 months ago)
Spaso-Eleazarovsky Convent met us on Christmas Eve wrapped in drifts of sparkling snow in the fabulous light of lanterns. The atmosphere outside its walls is sweet and inviting. Here is an ancient temple, icons, candles. The crosses are on the domes. And the warmth stored in the hearts falls on the shoulders.
Дмитрий Степанов (9 months ago)
Spaso-Eleazarovsky Convent met us on Christmas Eve wrapped in drifts of sparkling snow in the fabulous light of lanterns. The atmosphere outside its walls is sweet and inviting. Here is an ancient temple, icons, candles. The crosses are on the domes. And the warmth stored in the hearts falls on the shoulders.
Наталья Гудкова (11 months ago)
A beautiful well-kept monastery. A very pleasant place.
Наталья Гудкова (11 months ago)
A beautiful well-kept monastery. A very pleasant place.
Сергей Ледовой (11 months ago)
A place with great energy. Being on the territory of some monasteries I feel uncomfortable, but here it is very good and easy. Surprisingly quiet - even on a weekend there were practically no tourists and parishioners. In addition, this monastery played an important role in the development of Russian statehood, the concept "Moscow - the third Rome" was developed by the local monk Philotheus, about which there is a memorial tablet on the territory of the monastery.
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