Yelizarov Convent

Pskov, Russia

Yelizarov or Yeleazarov Convent is a small convent founded as a monastery in 1447 by a local peasant named Eleazar. He constructed the wooden church of Three Holy Fathers, wherein he was interred upon his death on 15 May 1481. Eleazar was canonized at the Stoglavy Sobor in 1551.

In the mid-16th century, the monastery was heavily fortified and attained a position of great importance and celebrity, owing to its learned hegumen, Philotheus of Pskov, who is credited with authorship of the Legend of the White Cowl and the Third Rome prophecy. It was during his hegumenship that the monastery became known for its school of icon-painters and its still-standing cathedral was built. Some scholars believe that the only known copy of the Lay of Igor's Campaign was created by one of local monks at the behest of Philotheus.

After seven decades of Soviet neglect, the monastery was revived as a nunnery patronized by Lyudmila Putina and Lyubov Sliska who commissioned a luxurious guest house for their prolonged stays at the convent.

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Address

Р60, Pskov, Russia
See all sites in Pskov

Details

Founded: 1447
Category: Religious sites in Russia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Татьяна Грива (2 years ago)
Намоленный райский уголочек...блажь душе, спокойствие, прикосновение к святыням. Очень часто посещаю. Господи, да какое здесь умиротворение.
Лена Матвеева (2 years ago)
Очень красиво, есть пруд с рыбами, яблоньки, всё очень впечатляет
Victor Lander (2 years ago)
Very nice and beautiful place
Валентина Кириленкова (2 years ago)
Природа и творение рук человеческих с божией помощью делают это место очень привлекательным для посещения. Здесь есть Чудотворная икона Христа Спасителя Спаса Всемилостивого.
MPV-VIDEO HDTV (2 years ago)
Очень красивое место, чисто убрана территория монастыря. Видно заботу. Было приятно побывать. Будем надеяться что удастся приехать еще и летом.
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