Pskov Krom

Pskov, Russia

The Pskov Krom (or Pskov Kremlin) is an ancient citadel in Pskov. In the central part of the city, the Krom is located at the junction of the Velikaya River and smaller Pskova river. The citadel is of medieval origin, with the surrounding walls constructed starting in the late 1400s. The Krom was the administrative and spiritual centre of the Pskov Republic in the 15th century. In 2010, two of the towers of seven (the Vlasyevskaya, which dates to the 15th or 16th century, and the Rybnitskaya, which dates to 13th or 14th) were damaged in a fire.

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Address

ulitsa Kreml' 2, Pskov, Russia
See all sites in Pskov

Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Russia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kemal Dunuroglu (3 years ago)
Really nice to see the history and simplicity of the times. Nice place to start historical tours to see the difference between influence from Moscow through the centuries.
C C (3 years ago)
Beautiful place the best for nice walk there
Mamon (4 years ago)
Photos in Peskov
Araik Asatryan (4 years ago)
Must see once.
Wladimir Pustovalov (5 years ago)
An old white cremlin with mighty walls. Inside there is an old church with probably the highest iconostas in Eurasia which probably is over 500 years old. Furthermore you can climb the walls and enjoy a beautiful view all over the monastery and the city between the river.
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