The Pskov Krom (or Pskov Kremlin) is an ancient citadel in Pskov. In the central part of the city, the Krom is located at the junction of the Velikaya River and smaller Pskova river. The citadel is of medieval origin, with the surrounding walls constructed starting in the late 1400s. The Krom was the administrative and spiritual centre of the Pskov Republic in the 15th century. In 2010, two of the towers of seven (the Vlasyevskaya, which dates to the 15th or 16th century, and the Rybnitskaya, which dates to 13th or 14th) were damaged in a fire.

References:

Comments

Your name



Address

ulitsa Kreml' 2, Pskov, Russia
See all sites in Pskov

Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Russia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mamon (2 years ago)
Photos in Peskov
Araik Asatryan (2 years ago)
Must see once.
Wladimir Pustovalov (3 years ago)
An old white cremlin with mighty walls. Inside there is an old church with probably the highest iconostas in Eurasia which probably is over 500 years old. Furthermore you can climb the walls and enjoy a beautiful view all over the monastery and the city between the river.
Andrey Strunin (3 years ago)
Interesting historical place with big Church inside. Some controversial modern improvements don't prevent from enjoying of whole view. It was interesting to explore walls and just walk in courtyard. Entrance is free of charge.
Jose Verona (3 years ago)
Historically this was a very important place, today is very well keep and the orthodox church is beautiful
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Redipuglia World War I Memorial

Redipuglia is the largest Italian Military Sacrarium. It rises up on the western front of the Monte Sei Busi, which, in the First World War was bitterly fought after because, although it was not very high, from its summit it allowed an ample range of access from the West to the first steps of the Karstic table area.

The monumental staircase on which the remains of one hundred thousand fallen soldiers are lined up and which has at its base the monolith of the Duke of Aosta, who was the commanding officer of the third Brigade, and gives an image of a military grouping in the field of a Great Unity with its Commanding Officer at the front. The mortal remains of 100,187 fallen soldiers lie here, 39,857 of them identified and 60,330 unknown.