Château de Trémazan

Landunvez, France

Château de Trémazan was constructed on a rocky outcrop and had a square keep which, following a partial collapse during the winter of 1995, exposed the interior to reveal a habitable tower of four floors, each with one chamber.

The history of Trémazan is intimately linked to that of the du Chastel (or Châtel) family. It was they who built it and made it their principal residence for several centuries. The origins of this dynasty are still shrouded in mist, but with the passage of history, they became very prominent. So much so that Chastels ended up taking their place in the high Breton aristocracy and being counted among the four most important families of the Viscounty of Léon. However, by the end of the 16th century, the elder branch of the family died out for lack of a male heir.

The present castle goes back mainly to the 13th and 14th centuries. The castle would have been built on the ruins of a castellum already existing in the 6th century. According to legend, Tanneguy du Chastel, founder of the abbey at Saint-Mathieu, was born here. The building became a stone castle around the 10th century. In 1220, it was destroyed during the war against the Duke of Brittany, then rebuilt thirty years later by Bernard du Châtel. Sold as national property after the French Revolution, the castle was abandoned in the 18th century. Apart from the 12th century square keep, remains include towers and the outer enceinte dating from the 13th, 14th and 15th centuries.

Today, the non-profit association S.O.S Château de Trémazan attempts to preserve the castle and to increase the knowledge of its past. Thus, samples of the castle beams gave rise to a study of dendrochronology for better dating of the building.

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Details

Founded: 10th century
Category: Ruins in France
Historical period: Frankish kingdoms (France)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Yann leostic (3 years ago)
Château de mon enfance, dommage que son état de dégrade de plus en plus
Zamorra61 (4 years ago)
Das muss man sich Ansehen
Marco Di Goïa (4 years ago)
Dommage qu'on ne puisse pas accéder aux ruines à pieds !
DELPHINE MARCHADOUR (4 years ago)
Lieu empreint de mystère dans un cadre magique
Bertrand coffin (4 years ago)
Château en ruine ne peut pas être visité. Belle vue sur Portsall
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