Château de la Motte-Glain

La Chapelle-Glain, France

The Château de la Motte-Glain was built by Pierre de Rohan-Gié in 1495 on the site of an older fortress belonging to the lords of Rougé. Anne of Brittany and Charles VIII stayed there in 1497 and Charles IX and Catherine de' Medici in 1565. It was bought in 1635 by par Michel Le Loup, counsellor to the Parlement of Brittany. The castle was modified by Pierre de Rohan-Gié in the 17th century.

The castle includes a gatehouse composed of a central pavilion flanked by two round towers, some ruined buildings (including a storeroom and a press), a residence decorated with Renaissance windows from the 15th century. The chapel contains a fresco from the 16th century.

The castle is privately owned. Parts of it (gatehouse, storeroom, press, chapel, residence, bay, roof, wall) have been listed since 1926 and protected since 1929 as a monument historique by the French Ministry of Culture. It is open to the public in the summer months.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 1495
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

BRIGITTE PRZYBYLSKI (3 years ago)
Tres bon accueil de la propriétaire alors que le chateau était fermé. Un grand merci
Jerome Paquot (4 years ago)
Formidable édifice, la visite vaut vraiment la peine, le guide est absolument formidable (en costume d'époque). A voir absolument!
Gisele PAINCHAUD (4 years ago)
Magnifique château , le guide est super et connais bien l histoire du château avec des charmantes anecdotes.
Clotilde OLIVIER (4 years ago)
J'ai laissé un avis sur tripadvisor et je le répète volontiers ici. C'est un très beau château; déjà bien rénové à l'extérieur. Lorsque l'intérieur le sera encore et que le mobilier sera mis en valeur, je suis sûre qu'il sera magnifique. Je donnerais aussi une super note à notre guide; passionné, il nous a passionnés. Volubile, il nous a enchantés. Il est l'âme de ce château! Ses connaissances en histoire et sa connaissance du château nous ont appris beaucoup de choses. Vraiment, une très belle découverte et un très bon moment. Une découverte à ne pas rater! On a aussi apprécié la balade autour du château et le plan d'eau très agréable. Très bon moment.
Jean Paul Hornung (5 years ago)
La propriétaire et le guide très accueillants. Une visite riche en informations intéressantes.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Broch of Gurness

The Broch of Gurness is an Iron Age broch village. Settlement here began sometime between 500 and 200 BC. At the centre of the settlement is a stone tower or broch, which once probably reached a height of around 10 metres. Its interior is divided into sections by upright slabs. The tower features two skins of drystone walls, with stone-floored galleries in between. These are accessed by steps. Stone ledges suggest that there was once an upper storey with a timber floor. The roof would have been thatched, surrounded by a wall walk linked by stairs to the ground floor. The broch features two hearths and a subterranean stone cistern with steps leading down into it. It is thought to have some religious significance, relating to an Iron Age cult of the underground.

The remains of the central tower are up to 3.6 metres high, and the stone walls are up to 4.1 metres thick. The tower was likely inhabited by the principal family or clan of the area but also served as a last resort for the village in case of an attack.

The broch continued to be inhabited while it began to collapse and the original structures were altered. The cistern was filled in and the interior was repartitioned. The ruin visible today reflects this secondary phase of the broch's use.

The site is surrounded by three ditches cut out of the rock with stone ramparts, encircling an area of around 45 metres diameter. The remains of numerous small stone dwellings with small yards and sheds can be found between the inner ditch and the tower. These were built after the tower, but were a part of the settlement's initial conception. A 'main street' connects the outer entrance to the broch. The settlement is the best-preserved of all broch villages.

Pieces of a Roman amphora dating to before 60 AD were found here, lending weight to the record that a 'King of Orkney' submitted to Emperor Claudius at Colchester in 43 AD.

At some point after 100 AD the broch was abandoned and the ditches filled in. It is thought that settlement at the broch continued into the 5th century AD, the period known as Pictish times. By that time the broch was not used anymore and some of its stones were reused to build smaller dwellings on top of the earlier buildings. Until about the 8th century, the site was just a single farmstead.

In the 9th century, a Norse woman was buried at the site in a stone-lined grave with two bronze brooches and a sickle and knife made from iron. Other finds suggest that Norse men were buried here too.