Château de l'Oiselinière

Gorges, France

The Oiselinière estate was, before the French Revolution a 'Seigniory'. It is mentioned as early as 1335 in the charter 'Les Actes'. It spreads over the districts of Gorges and Clisson, and under the feudal system depended on the Seigneurs of Clisson and Pallet. For 643 years, this Seigniory only changed families four times: Maurice le Meigen was the owner, then in 1460 one of this descendants through allegiance, Claude Grézeau took over. His family sold the seigniory of the Oiselinière to Jean Goulet de la Fosse de Nantes in 1613. Louis de la Bourdonnaye acquired the property in 1658. Then in 1767, the seigniory was sold to the ancestors of the Aulanier family (This family made a great contribution in the Second World War, Oselinière being a hotbed of resistance).

The castle is a villa built in Italian style between 1822 and 1835 to enclose a square courtyard dated from the 17th century. The villa, the outbuildings, the orangery and the gallery of 'Les Illustres' are included in the inventory of historical monuments since 1997 and are cited as reference in the inventory 'Clisson or return to Italy.'

To the west of the villa, near the orangery stands a set of architectural interest with six niches on its main facade which are made of circular brick and adorned with busts of famous men. From left to right, we can recognize Olivier de Clisson, Conde, Duquesne, Jean Bart, and Bayard Duguesclin.

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Address

L´Oizelinière, Gorges, France
See all sites in Gorges

Details

Founded: 1335
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

Rating

3.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Fab Mon (2 years ago)
À voir ...!! La propriété de l’Oiselinière était avant la Révolution française une seigneurie. Elle est signalée dans « les Actes » du chartrier déjà depuis 1335 et elle s’étendait sur les communes de Gorges et de Clisson, et relevait féodalement des seigneurs de Clisson et du Pallet. Durant 643 ans, cette seigneurie ne change que quatre fois de propriétaires : c’est Maurice le Meignen qui en est le premier propriétaire connu, puis en 1460, l’un de ses descendants par alliance, Claude Grézeau. Sa famille vend la seigneurie de l’Oiselinière à Jean Goulet de la Fosse de Nantes en 1613. Vient ensuite par acquisition Louis de la Bourdonnaye en 1658. Puis en 1767, vente de la seigneurie aux ancêtres de la famille Aulanier. En 2006, Georges Verdier et sa famille se portent acquéreurs et deviennent propriétaires du Château de l’Oiselinière ... ☺
yoneh mizrahi (3 years ago)
BEWARE OF THIS PLACE! The treatment and hospitality received over here has been absolutely horrific
Ian Watts (3 years ago)
We had a good welcome and was shown to our lovely room. It was very large, as you would expect from a chateau. After driving a long way we wanted to relax and sat in the little suntrap for guests with wicker chairs. It was lovely. They make their own wine which was on sale in the lounge fridge. We had a bottle and chilled. Breakfast was served in the orangery with lovely cutlery and porcelain crockery. Homemade yoghurt and butter. Croissants, cheese and ham and of course orange and coffee. Bought some of their delicious wine and said goodbye. Very nice and would recommend.
Felix Haupt (3 years ago)
Nice location, but worst hospitality and service experience! Check-in not available at announced hours (before, owner was on site, but did not open the door). When we finally found somebody at the estate in the evening, we were not granted access because of our little dog, although the booking website clearly states that pets are allowed and we notified them months before. We were at the site three times that day and needed to find ad hoc a new place to sleep. We were travelling with our 1 year old doughter... Would not recommend this place at all!
Anne-Sophie Kergaravat (4 years ago)
Comfortable, quiet, really nice historic castle - hotel ! Really nice owner and great breakfast!
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