Belarusian National Arts Museum

Minsk, Belarus

Belarusian National Arts Museum is the largest museum in the country. More than twenty seven thousand works of art – creating twenty miscellaneous collections and comprising two main representative ones: the one of national art and the other of monuments of art of the countries and nations of the world – can be found on exposition, at the branches of the Museum and its depositories.

The Museum’s official history begins on January, 24 in 1939 when under the Resolution of the Council of People's Commissars of Belarus the State Art Gallery has been created in Minsk. At the beginning of 1941 the Belarusian State Art Gallery’s funds and stocks had already numbered nearly 2711 art works out of which four hundred were on exhibition. A long-term work on the description and study of each monument as well as on the creation of the museum collection’s catalogue was to be done. The fate of the whole collection was tragically unfavorable during the first days of the World War II. In a short time it would disappear without even leaving a trace.

After the war merely a small part of the works of art was returned, mainly those which before the War had been at the exhibitions in Russia. In spite of the postwar devastation, when Minsk lay in ruins, the Government of Belarus allocated considerable sums of money for purchasing works of art for the Gallery. It was already in August 1945 when the canvases by Boris Kustodiev, Vasily Polenov, Karl Briullov and Isaak Levitan were obtained.

The construction of the new building of the Belarusian State Art Gallery with the ten spacious halls, occupying two floors and a large gallery, was finished in 1957. In those years the Museum’s collection had already reached the pre-war level and included about three thousand works of Russian, Soviet and Belarusian art.

The period of the 1970s and the early 1980s was a peak of the Museum’s exhibition activity. The collection of the Belarusian modern painting and graphic arts were taken from the Museum’s funds for exhibitions abroad. Since 1993 the Museum has been called the National Art Museum of the Republic of Belarus.

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Address

Vulitsa Lyenina, Minsk, Belarus
See all sites in Minsk

Details

Founded: 1939
Category: Museums in Belarus

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Elena Abilova (2 years ago)
Great collection, good guides og very knowledgeable and helpful stuff
Matrix (3 years ago)
Loved this museum. There were hardly any people there when I visited. Highly recommend it if you're visiting Minsk. Great collection of beautiful art.
Sneha Lodhia (3 years ago)
Very beautiful museum.. The arts and paintings are unbelievably amazing! Pay a visit if you love art and history.
Mr. Cuddles (3 years ago)
Its small but organized, they have some temp and permanent thing. The little cute cafe is nice and it tastes good. The employees are knowledgeable and pretty friendly(although some take time to warm-up, those end up the best people). Over all I recommend to visit this place.
Alexander Degtyarev (3 years ago)
Don't expect good attitude. Came 30 minutes before closing to check small exhibition, but was not welcome. A lot of people watch you over the exhibition, which is not quite comfortable. Wish there were more friendliness in service.
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