Cathedral of Saint Virgin Mary

Minsk, Belarus

Cathedral of the Holy Name of Mary is a Roman Catholic Baroque cathedral. It was built in 1710 as a church for the Jesuit house. In 1793, after the Russian conquest of Belarus, the Jesuit order was banned and the church got a local status. Soon, after creation of the Minsk diocese, the church became the local cathedral.

The Cathedral was heavily damaged in a fire in 1797, but was later fully renewed. In 1869, the Minsk diocese was liquidated and the church got a parafial status. In November 1917, the diocese was restored; Zygmunt Lazinski was appointed as a bishop. In 1920, Lazinski was arrested by Soviet authorities, the cathedral was closed down in 1934.

During the Second World War, the Germans allowed the cathedral to function again, but after the war it was again closed down by the Soviets. In 1951, the cathedral's bell towers were intentionally destroyed by Soviet artillery and the building itself was given to the Spartak sports society.

In the beginning of the 1990s, religious services started again. In 1993, the building was given back to the Roman Catholics; by 1997 it was renewed. In 2005, the church was given a new organ manufactured in Austria. Around the same time, the frescoes created in 18th century were also restored.

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Address

Ploshcha Svabody, Minsk, Belarus
See all sites in Minsk

Details

Founded: 1710
Category: Religious sites in Belarus

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Марина Кипель (18 months ago)
Светлый, замечательный храм. Можно зайти на Богослужение, либо просто побыть в тишине. Периодически проводятся концерты органной музыки. 13.01 была на концерте хора Солютарис. Очень впечатляет исполнение. Акустика как в храме- великолепная!
Andrea Russo (2 years ago)
Una chiesa cristiana che si trova vicino al monumento del Sindaco e all'edificio City Hall di Minsk. Per raggiungere la chiesa bisogna attraversare una strada abbastanza grande ma nessun problema a farlo. Vista solo esternamente si presenta con due campanili ed è circondata da abitazioni che forse la nascondono un pò rispetto ad altre chiese ed edifici liberi da altri palazzi circostanti. Essa è molto ben curata e sicuramente ne vale la pena visitarla anche internamente.
Artur Buko (2 years ago)
Main Catholic Church in Belarus
Edu Maguiña Quilcate (3 years ago)
Amazing place very nice cathedral.
Gatto Uno (4 years ago)
The church is beautiful and so is the well kept surrounding, it also gets busy with lot of quality restaurants and bars in the area - good place to hang out.
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