Holy Spirit Cathedral

Minsk, Belarus

Holy Spirit Cathedral was built in Baroque style between 1633-1642 as the main temple of Catholic Bernadine convent. During the 1700-1800s it was reconstructed to the present architectural shape. In 1852 the convent was closed, and its nuns were sent to Nesvizh town. In I860 the former monastic church was turned into the orthodox church. After ten years an orthodox monastery was opened here.

In 1918, after the closing of the monastery, the building was used for various purposes: as a sports hall, a transit prison for the dispossessed peasants. The services were renewed during World War II, in 1943. The most valuable relic is the wonder-working icon of Mother of God found in 1500. The other relic of the temple is imperishable relics of St. Sofia of Slutsk, a grand daughter of Anastasia of Sluck.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 1633-1642
Category: Religious sites in Belarus

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Evgeny Baranov (3 years ago)
That church has its' own, unique and attracting spirit. It's normally crowdy, but I love coming there. My first church experience place, moreover.
Yuri Pustovoy (4 years ago)
Main Cathedral of the city, located in a beautiful place
Ben Kilhams (5 years ago)
Very interesting church with nice architecture.
Rob Curry-Smithson (5 years ago)
It's a church in a nice neighborhood. Good views from here.
Matthew McDonald (6 years ago)
The Holy Spirit Cathedral is the main cathedral of the Belarusian Orthodox Church and dates back to 1633-1642. This was located next to our hotel in Minsk so we passed by it many times each day, as a functioning church it had a constant flow of visitors at all hours. There is plenty to see around the Cathedral with exhibitions often held to the side, many other interesting buildings, hotels and restaurants. The subway is located nearby as well.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Gruyères Castle

The Castle of Gruyères is one of the most famous in Switzerland. It was built between 1270 and 1282, following the typical square plan of the fortifications in Savoy. It was the property of the Counts of Gruyères until the bankruptcy of the Count Michel in 1554. His creditors the cantons of Fribourg and Bern shared his earldom. From 1555 to 1798 the castle became residence to the bailiffs and then to the prefects sent by Fribourg.

In 1849 the castle was sold to the Bovy and Balland families, who used the castle as their summer residency and restored it. The castle was then bought back by the canton of Fribourg in 1938, made into a museum and opened to the public. Since 1993, a foundation ensures the conservation as well as the highlighting of the building and the art collection.

The castle is the home of three capes of the Order of the Golden Fleece. They were part of the war booty captured by the Swiss Confederates (which included troops from Gruyères) at the Battle of Morat against Charles the Bold, Duke of Burgundy in 1476. As Charles the Bold was celebrating the anniversary of his father's death, one of the capes is a black velvet sacerdotal vestment with Philip the Good's emblem sewn into it.

A collection of landscapes by 19th century artists Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot, Barthélemy Menn and others are on display in the castle.