Holy Spirit Cathedral

Minsk, Belarus

Holy Spirit Cathedral was built in Baroque style between 1633-1642 as the main temple of Catholic Bernadine convent. During the 1700-1800s it was reconstructed to the present architectural shape. In 1852 the convent was closed, and its nuns were sent to Nesvizh town. In I860 the former monastic church was turned into the orthodox church. After ten years an orthodox monastery was opened here.

In 1918, after the closing of the monastery, the building was used for various purposes: as a sports hall, a transit prison for the dispossessed peasants. The services were renewed during World War II, in 1943. The most valuable relic is the wonder-working icon of Mother of God found in 1500. The other relic of the temple is imperishable relics of St. Sofia of Slutsk, a grand daughter of Anastasia of Sluck.

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Details

Founded: 1633-1642
Category: Religious sites in Belarus

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Evgeny Baranov (18 months ago)
That church has its' own, unique and attracting spirit. It's normally crowdy, but I love coming there. My first church experience place, moreover.
Yuri Pustovoy (2 years ago)
Main Cathedral of the city, located in a beautiful place
Ben Kilhams (3 years ago)
Very interesting church with nice architecture.
Rob Curry-Smithson (3 years ago)
It's a church in a nice neighborhood. Good views from here.
Matthew McDonald (4 years ago)
The Holy Spirit Cathedral is the main cathedral of the Belarusian Orthodox Church and dates back to 1633-1642. This was located next to our hotel in Minsk so we passed by it many times each day, as a functioning church it had a constant flow of visitors at all hours. There is plenty to see around the Cathedral with exhibitions often held to the side, many other interesting buildings, hotels and restaurants. The subway is located nearby as well.
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