Nederhemert Castle has been built, rebuilt and expanded numerous times throughout its turbulent history. It started life as a keep in the 13th century and was expanded into a polygonal castle with four towers over several centuries. In 1945, the castle was destroyed by fire and fell into ruin. It was restored to its former glory in 2005.

Nederhemert castle is situated on an ancient bend in the river Maas. As with many castles, the date when the castle was first built is unknown, yet Johan van Hemert is named as owner of this ‘stronghold at Hemert’ in 1310. The oldest parts of the castle date from the end of the 13th century: a two-storey keep and a cellar with notable Bohemian-style vaulting. Some 30 years later, the keep was expanded with the addition of two corner towers - one rectangular, one round - with a walled courtyard in between. A great hall and gateway were added around 1350, and a hexagonal tower was added in the 15th century. These additions transformed Nederhemert into an imposing castle.

The castle remained as it was for several centuries until it was renovated into a comfortable country house at the end of the 19th century. The castle was plastered and given crenellations, a veranda and a balcony in neo-Gothic style. Over its 650-year history, Nederhemert was home to many noble families. It even boasted a bed said to have belonged to Maarten van Rossum, the Duke of Guelders’ most notorious field marshal. At the end of WWII, the castle and its contents were completely destroyed by fire.

The last owners sold what was left of the castle and its surrounding parkland to the Dutch state, which transferred the estate, in turn, to the Geldersch Landschap and Geldersche Kasteelen national heritage foundations. There was a lack of funding for the restoration for some time and the castle fell into ruin. Restoration work finally took place between 2001 and 2005, returning Nederhemert, as much as possible, to its medieval glory. The castle now houses offices and is only open to the public in a limited capacity.

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Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Netherlands

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User Reviews

Anton Danen (20 months ago)
Het kasteel is niet openbaar toegankelijk, maar het landgoed daaromheen is mooi, zeker in het vroege voorjaar.
Castle Biker (2 years ago)
Oud kasteel in het buitengebied aan de Maas. Zag er leuk uit, je kan erom heen lopen, maar het kasteel niet heel goed bekijken. De poort was dicht, had het graag van dichterbij willen zien.
Fieke Van Andel (2 years ago)
Prachtige locatie ook om te wandelen
Ester Dammers (2 years ago)
Mooi kasteel met een bijzondere modern-versus-historie interieur. Voor mij persoonlijk was het een afknapper om bureau's en kantoorstoelen in zo'n prachtpand terug te vinden omdat ik er een voorstander van ben om alles te laten zoals het is, maar het interieur is wel bijzonder en met respect voor de historie van het kasteel gemaakt. Daar is ook wat van te zeggen.
Warner van Gils (2 years ago)
Mooi die combinatie van een eeuwenoud huis waar een modern bedrijf gebruik van maakt
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